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12 Angry Men: 8th Juror Importance

10678 words - 43 pages

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TWILIGHT By
Stephenie Meyer Contents
PREFACE 1. FIRST SIGHT 2. OPEN BOOK 3. PHENOMENON 4. INVITATIONS 5. BLOOD TYPE 6. SCARY STORIES 7. NIGHTMARE 8. PORT ANGELES 9. THEORY 10. INTERROGATIONS 11. COMPLICATIONS 12. BALANCING 13. CONFESSIONS 14. MIND OVER MATTER 15. THE CULLENS 16. CARLISLE 17. THE GAME 18. THE HUNT 19. GOODBYES 20. IMPATIENCE 21. PHONE CALL 22. HIDE-AND-SEEK 23. THE ANGEL 24. AN IMPASSE EPILOGUE: AN OCCASION

twilight
STEPHENIE MEYER
LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY
New York Boston
Text copyright © 2005 by Stephenie Meyer
All rights reserved.
Little, Brown and Company
Time Warner Book Group
1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020
Visit our Web site at www.lb-teens.com
First Edition: September 2005
The characters and events portrayed in this book are fictitious.
Any similarity to real persons, living or dead, is coincidental and not intended by the author.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Meyer, Stephanie, 1973-
Twilight : a novel / by Stephanie Meyer. - 1st ed.
p. cm.
Summary: When seventeen-year-old Bella leaves Phoenix to live with her father in Forks, Washington, she meets an exquisitely handsome boy at school for whom she feels an overwhelming attraction and who
she comes to realize is not wholly human.
ISBN 0-316-16017-2
[1. Vampires - Fiction. 2. High schools - Fiction. 3. Schools - Fiction.
4. Washington (State) - Fiction.] I. Title. PZ7.M57188Tw2005
[Fic] -dc22 2004024730
Printed in the United States of America
For my big sister, Emily,
without whose enthusiasm this story might still be unfinished.
But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it:
for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.
Genesis 2:17
PREFACE
I'd never given much thought to how I would die - though I'd had reason enough in the last few months - but even if I had, I would not have imagined it like this.

I stared without breathing across the long room, into the dark eyes of the hunter, and he looked pleasantly back at me.
Surely it was a good way to die, in the place of someone else, someone I loved. Noble, even. That ought to count for something.
I knew that if I'd never gone to Forks, I wouldn't be facing death now. But, terrified as I was, I couldn't bring myself to regret the decision. When life offers you a dream so far beyond any of your expectations, it's not reasonable to grieve when it comes to an end.
The hunter smiled in a friendly way as he sauntered forward to kill me.
1. FIRST SIGHT
My mother drove me to the airport with the windows rolled down. It was seventy-five degrees in Phoenix, the sky a perfect, cloudless blue. I was wearing my favorite shirt - sleeveless, white eyelet lace; I was wearing it as a farewell gesture. My carry-on item was a parka.
In the Olympic Peninsula of northwest...

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