14th Century Outbreak Of The Black Plague

1293 words - 5 pages

14th Century Outbreak of the Black Plague

In 1300, multiple out breaks of the Black Plague arised. For example, in the thirteenth century an outbreak in China killed one third of the population. Several dates before this time showed the disease was present years ago in Europe. Dying from the Plague was scary to most people and Jordan Mcmullin, an author stresses, “Whenever the Plague appeared the sadness of death was terrifying” (Mcmullin n.pag.). Death has always been frightening, but when a country plagues with disease, death becomes a terrible fear, the Plague scared the people of 541, and 542, when their outbreak of the Plague spread. Therefore, while other outbreaks of the Black Plague took place, the fourteenth century outbreak in Europe was certainly the worst.
Before the Black Plague, living in Britain was interesting and positive but, was not always pleasant. It was too crowded and dirty, Britain was disgusting and unsanitary for the citizens for a long period of time, even before the disease spread to Europe (Ibeji n.pag.). Thus, Britain being so dirty, it was easier for this disease to spread. The citizens of Europe had no clue what was coming to disease them. Many people were not ready for the cultural changes of the disease and were shocked the disease even reached their towns.
In 1347, Europe began to perceive what the Plague had in store. Terrible outcomes arose when the citizens caught the Plague from fleas. The transfer of fleas to humans caused the outbreak of the Black Death. Infections that rodents caught were passed on to fleas, which would find a host to bite, spreading the terrible disease (“Plague the Black Death” n.pag.). When Genoese ships arrived back to Europe from China, with dead sailors and rats, the disease began to spread rapidly. Physicians could not decipher what the disease was, it made it harder for them to find a cure. However in 1894, scientists discovered “Yersinia Pestis,” a parasite on rats and the fleas attached to them (Bridge n.pag.). These fleas were a significant source of disease, and the reason the disease spread. They caused the first of the three types of disease, the Bubonic Plague. This type of Plague was fifty percent fatal. The lumps people received from this type of disease were large and foul. “Black, often gangrenous boils formed at the point of the bite” (Bridge n.pag.). Doctors described these boils as deadly. The second type the Pneumonic Plague was an infection in the lungs, which caused fevers and extreme coughing. This type of disease was ninety percent fatal. The third, and most dangerous type, was the Septicamemic Plague, which was 100% fatal. After the flea had bitten into the skin a rash would form, killing the person in only a single day. This disease usually started with a headache, fever, or hard black lumps. The disease was painful and usually made most citizens feel dreadful.
With this in mind, scientists and physicians at this period of time had several theories...

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