"1984" By George Orwell And The World Today

1486 words - 6 pages

“1984” is a story about George Orwell’s prediction on how the world will end up like in that year and era. The main character Winston Smith is a party member in a totalitarian society led by Big Brother, which censors everyone’s behavior and thoughts. The world being split into 3 countries: Oceania, Eurasia, Eastasia and is supposedly all be in war with each other. Oceania is where Winston lives. While being monitored 24/7, Winston gets disgusted from his life style and wrote journals about what he thinks of his life and about the government, writing was against the law and is consider a “thought” crime so he kept it well hidden that he doesn’t doubt Big Brother at all. Winston later learns about a secret society called the Brotherhood, a supposed group of anonymous rebels that intends to overthrow the government. He begins seek answers about his past and in doing so he met and fell in love with a girl named Julia, who had the same views as he did about Big Brother. They eventually got caught together by a trap set up by the government and heard everything the two talked about. They both got interrogated and were forced to betray each other and be brainwashed to love Big Brother again.A “so what” factor I would like to write about is simply this. So what if the government is in complete control? George Orwell’s vision of the future is deeply disturbing and I can’t help to wonder that some of the things he had mentioned are kind of happening today in our time. Suppose what Big Brother is doing is actually saving people from themselves by limiting things they should know or want to know and promising them security but taking their privacy in doing so. This relates to how our government today has been keeping watch on suspicious people and activity in order to prevent terrorism. People don’t realize that the more security we want, we must give up some privacy in order for that to happen. There are cameras everywhere now, in buildings, schools, malls, and the streets watching everything we do. Our only proof of existence is simply a social security number, without one you can disappear from the face of the earth. The government is gaining power more than ever because of the war in Iraq. We have no idea what is going on over there, but only get information from the news or the TV, who knows what the government could be hiding from us. They want us to be afraid and rely on them to protect us, this is how they are beginning to gain control over the people. I believe that the government should be afraid of its people, not the other way around. One of the slogans of the political party from the book, “Ignorance is strength” is completely true, because what we don’t know just makes us put our lives in the hands of our government.The world today isn’t completely the same as in “1984”, we still have more freedom and our country isn’t messed up by war and constant...

Find Another Essay On "1984" by George Orwell and the World Today

1984, by George Orwell. Essay

1829 words - 7 pages had imagined."Nonetheless, by the novel's end, Big Brother is ultimately victorious, having won over the last man in Europe. In today's world, Big Brother is still a force, especially to those who worry about the continued possibility of the rise of totalitarianism today. However, there is another face to Big Brother, which is precisely that "manipulation of popular feelings and ideas by the mass media" about which Orwell warned. If people find

1984 By George Orwell Essay

1955 words - 8 pages . Synopsis: 1984 starts off the bleak view of Oceania; a desolate place without plant life, full of shifting dust and images of lonely buildings in an empty street. Winston Smith walked home\surrounded by posters proclaiming “Big Brother is Watching You”. Smith does not like the Party but expressing his opinion would mean certain death. Thought

"1984" by George Orwell.

1337 words - 5 pages METHODS OF CONTROL===========================================================In the novel Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell there is a system of controlling by manipulating the populations thoughts. History in the novel is distorted or completely altered by the upper Party who control the proletarians and lower Party. The states in Nineteen Eighty-four are led by a high powered minority group who keeps a heavy eye on the rest of the

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

2462 words - 10 pages could never happen, but George Orwell illustrates, throughout his novel 1984, the possible dangers of complete government control. Even though this exaggerated society seems farfetched, many of his fictional governmental qualities are starting to line up with our government today. Throughout the novel the totalitarian government, called Big Brother, is constantly attacking the people psychologically. One of the first things that strikes protagonist

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

1567 words - 6 pages Throughout history there has always been the people who attempt to take power and use that power to control others.  History shows, that certain government’s abuse their power and use it in various ways against their own people.  Both Stalin’s Party and the Party members from nineteen eight four by George Orwell, use their power against the people the govern over.  The novel is similar to Stalin’s Russia because of various factors.  The way they

Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984

1346 words - 5 pages Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984 Since the onset of the United States, Americans have always viewed the future in two ways; one, as the perfect society with a perfect government, or two, as a communistic hell where free will no longer exists and no one is happy. The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a combination of both theories. On the "bad" side, a communist state exists which is enforced with surveillance technology

"1984" by George Orwell Analysis

2429 words - 10 pages "1984" by George Orwell AnalysisWhen two claims contradict one another, it is futile and useless in attempting to analogize between the two. George Orwell, the author of the novel 1984, defines doublethink as "the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them." It is the idea of genuinely accepting two conflicting ideas, which eliminates an individual's capacity of being able to think or act

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and 1984 by George Orwell

2520 words - 10 pages much worse.” (Dietz, 1996) Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and 1984 by George Orwell are considered classic examples of this genre by such critics as Frank Dietz, Beaird Glover, and Donald Watt. These distinct novels both warn against utopia through the portrayal of the protagonist begins as part of a society in which the individual is non-existent, come into contact with influences that cause their rebellions, and eventually come into contact with

1984, by George Orwell and Gattaca, by Andrew Niccol

1041 words - 4 pages Nineteen Eighty-Four written by George Orwell and Gattaca directed by Andrew Niccol are prophetic social commentaries which explore the broad social wrong of a totalitarian government. Both texts depict a futuristic, dystopian society in which individuality is destroyed in favour of faceless conformity. Niccol and Orwell through the experiences of their protagonists reflect the impact isolation from society has on individuals. The authors of

1984, by George Orwell and Brazil, by Terry Gilliam

998 words - 4 pages they attempt to dream and change their lives, in the end they change nothing. Works Cited Brazil. Dir. Terry Gilliam. Perf Jonathan Pryce. 1985. Orwell, George. 1984. Signet Classics, Penguin: New York, NY, 1949 "Brazil (film)." Wikipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2011. . C, Court. "Movie analysis: Brazil - by Court C - Helium." Helium - Where Knowledge Rules. N.p., n.d. Web. 15

"George Orwell" and the Mad World: The Anti-Universe of 1984.

3672 words - 15 pages view of reality by the strong few upon the weak many, through overwhelming force. O'Brien must "save" Winston, but this is religious salvation turned backward, and its purpose is to prevent even one "just man" from existing anywhere in the world, by convincing that man that he is insane. "Is it possible that a whole society can be insane?" asked Orwell in one of his essays, speaking of Hitler's Germany.Orwell's 1984 is about religion reversed, law

Similar Essays

1984 By George Orwell. Essay

1197 words - 5 pages , Orwell had witnessed the danger of absolute political authority in an age of advanced technology. He illustrated that peril harshly in 1984. The rise to power of dictators such as Adolf Hitler in Germany and Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union inspired Orwell's mounting hatred of totalitarianism and political authority.In the novel, Orwell draws on his own understanding of totalitarianism to create a very believable world dominated by a totalitarian

1984 By George Orwell Essay

808 words - 4 pages . Psychological manipulation in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, is used as one of the party’ main control tactics. The party uses different forms of psychological manipulation within the society such as, the influence of telescreens to instill fear in citizens and create a lack of privacy within the society. Secondly, the party uses psychological manipulation in the children by inducing them into groups that are pro Big Brother at a young age. And also, the

1984, By George Orwell Essay

1070 words - 4 pages It is feasible that in the future machines may be more powerful than man, to such an extent that machines control mankind, mechanizing human life. This is seen in Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano, a post-World War III society in which machines are more powerful than mankind (Ponniah 229).The Technology in 1984, by George Orwell, has a similar influence. 1984 portrays a totalitarian society, powered by the icon of Big Brother. Big Brother and his

"1984" By George Orwell. Essay

3723 words - 15 pages Author:The book Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell was written in 1948 and published in 1949. It is one of Orwell´s most famous books.Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in