This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

How Effective Is The Ending Of 1984 By George Orwell?

791 words - 3 pages

One of the most important structures for a story is the ending, and the question that always should be asked is “How effective is the ending?” The purpose of the ending is to try to clarify to the readers the message that was trying to be said throughout the book, and looking at how well this is done is answering the question “How effective is the ending?” In 1984, written by George Orwell, we will see how effective 1984s ending is, and how well it was written.

The beginning of the closing chapter (Chapter 6; part 3), starts off with imagery “A ray of sunlight slanting through a window” “A tinny music trickled from the telescreens” these terms of imagery make the reader imagine as if they were at the moment, which has a big effect on the reader. The term “a ray of sunlight” starts to confuse the readers because usually sunlight is associated with happiness, but throughout the description the readers notice that the environment is not happy. The events of the final chapter has great effect on the readers, the events that take place at the Chestnut tree café are very normal and calm, no one has reacted to Winston’s appearance after being tortured, this shows how the act of being tortured and beaten is normal, but having the waiter fill Winston’s glass unbidden shows the waiters sympathy to Winston. Winston not being able to think is a sign that points to the ending. Orwell’s uses symbolism, where he symbolizes Big Brother as the white chess peace, white symbolizes good, and this contradicts to the beginning of the book, where he shows Big Brother as a cruel, unjust person. There is a use of memory, where Orwell reminds the readers of what has happened before and how it is going to affect the ending, “They cant get inside she said” Winston begins to question himself as he tells himself “But they could get inside you”, there is inner conflict with the character Winston. There is a reuniting between Winston and Julia, where Winston describes Julia how she changed physically and emotionally, he describes her as if she became lifeless, he also tells the readers the conflict that happened between them, and this gives an effective mood to the readers, the readers start to feel the emotion that...

Find Another Essay On How Effective is the Ending of 1984 by George Orwell?

1984, by George Orwell Essay

1829 words - 7 pages uprisings against the Soviet machine, from the Hungarian Revolution to the student uprisings in France, from the Prague Spring to the rise of Solidarity in Poland, to the eventual fall of the Berlin Wall, demonstrate that the proletariat, and even party intellectuals, were not completely crushed by Party ideology, and that, in Esslin's words, "the totalitarian manipulation of popular feelings and ideas by the mass media is far less effective than Orwell

"1984" by George Orwell Essay

3723 words - 15 pages Author:The book Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell was written in 1948 and published in 1949. It is one of Orwell´s most famous books.Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in

1984 By George Orwell

1955 words - 8 pages . Synopsis: 1984 starts off the bleak view of Oceania; a desolate place without plant life, full of shifting dust and images of lonely buildings in an empty street. Winston Smith walked home\surrounded by posters proclaiming “Big Brother is Watching You”. Smith does not like the Party but expressing his opinion would mean certain death. Thought

"1984" by George Orwell

1337 words - 5 pages METHODS OF CONTROL===========================================================In the novel Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell there is a system of controlling by manipulating the populations thoughts. History in the novel is distorted or completely altered by the upper Party who control the proletarians and lower Party. The states in Nineteen Eighty-four are led by a high powered minority group who keeps a heavy eye on the rest of the

The Political Satire of The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

1486 words - 6 pages In the words of Bob Dylan, “No one is free, even the birds are chained to the sky.” It is ironic how this saying profoundly explains the political satire of the novel, 1984. Living under a tyrannical system, no one is safe in the novel, including 39-year-old, Winston Smith who lives in a society where he is taken away of all his rights and freedoms, in which even a tiny facial gesture can be deemed a detriment to society. 1984, written by George

The Invasion of Privacy in 1984 by George Orwell

1525 words - 6 pages surveillance of friends and family. Works Cited America is Now Officially an Orwellian Totalitarian State: The Complete Interactive Guide To How The NSA Spies On Everything You Do. Ed. Tyler Durden. 7 April 2014. -----------------------------------------7 April 2014 Biography of George Orwell: George Orwell. Ed. C.D. Merriman. 2006

General Commentary of 1984 by George Orwell

1889 words - 8 pages General Commentary of 1984 by George Orwell George Orwell's dystopian (a fictional place where people lead dehumanized and fearful lives) vision of the year 1984, as depicted in what many consider to be his greatest novel, has entered the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world more completely than perhaps any other political text, whether fiction or nonfiction. No matter how far our contemporary world may seem from 1984

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

2462 words - 10 pages could never happen, but George Orwell illustrates, throughout his novel 1984, the possible dangers of complete government control. Even though this exaggerated society seems farfetched, many of his fictional governmental qualities are starting to line up with our government today. Throughout the novel the totalitarian government, called Big Brother, is constantly attacking the people psychologically. One of the first things that strikes protagonist

The Dangers of Totalitarianism in 1984, by George Orwell

1111 words - 4 pages telling them. Which means the party is able to control the past, and by doing so they control the present. Changing all history and controlling the present affects what happens in the past (Howe, pars. 11-12). George Orwell clearly shows the dangers of totalitarianism in his novel Nineteen-Eighty Four. In Nineteen-Eighty Four, the party controls its citizens in all aspects of life, and monitors their every move. With all the power the party has, it is almost impossible to start a rebellion. In my opinion, totalitarianism is an awful government system.

"1984" by George Orwell: Individualism: Preventing the Terror of Totalitarianism

994 words - 4 pages 1984, by George Orwell, is, on the surface, the story of one man's rebellion against the system in a futuristic totalitarian world. Every word and movement of the citizens is monitored and controlled; even their thoughts are not their own. They are manipulated by the insidious propaganda of the government, Big Brother, that serves to weaken the power of the people. This relates to what the dictator, Josef Stalin, once said: "Power is not in the

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

1567 words - 6 pages Throughout history there has always been the people who attempt to take power and use that power to control others.  History shows, that certain government’s abuse their power and use it in various ways against their own people.  Both Stalin’s Party and the Party members from nineteen eight four by George Orwell, use their power against the people the govern over.  The novel is similar to Stalin’s Russia because of various factors.  The way they

Similar Essays

Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984

1346 words - 5 pages Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984 Since the onset of the United States, Americans have always viewed the future in two ways; one, as the perfect society with a perfect government, or two, as a communistic hell where free will no longer exists and no one is happy. The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a combination of both theories. On the "bad" side, a communist state exists which is enforced with surveillance technology

1984 By George Orwell Essay

1197 words - 5 pages himself as a political writer. Many of his books reflected his animosity of communism and totalitarianism.The book "Nineteen Eighty-four" by George Orwell was written in 1948 and published in 1949. It is one of Orwell's most famous books."Nineteen Eighty-four" is one of Orwell's best-crafted novels, and it remains one of the most powerful warnings ever issued against the dangers of a totalitarian society. In Spain, Germany, and the Soviet Union

1984 By George Orwell Essay

808 words - 4 pages . Psychological manipulation in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, is used as one of the party’ main control tactics. The party uses different forms of psychological manipulation within the society such as, the influence of telescreens to instill fear in citizens and create a lack of privacy within the society. Secondly, the party uses psychological manipulation in the children by inducing them into groups that are pro Big Brother at a young age. And also, the

1984, By George Orwell Essay

1070 words - 4 pages It is feasible that in the future machines may be more powerful than man, to such an extent that machines control mankind, mechanizing human life. This is seen in Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano, a post-World War III society in which machines are more powerful than mankind (Ponniah 229).The Technology in 1984, by George Orwell, has a similar influence. 1984 portrays a totalitarian society, powered by the icon of Big Brother. Big Brother and his