A Biography Of William Faulkner Written By Cynthia Rose

2008 words - 8 pages

In the 1950s, books, an established form of entertainment, would be challenged by one of the most successful inventions known to man, the television. Faulkner, recognized as one of the greatest novelists in both America and the world’s literature cannon, was ready to change the way of writing novels forever. William Faulkner was awarded a Nobel Prize for his powerful and artistic contribution to American literature through his compositions (Rose 2). William Faulkner gave his Nobel Prize acceptance speech on December 10, 1950 in Stockholm, Sweden, but he did not just accept this award with gratitude and honor. Instead, William Faulkner’s speech spoke volumes for both current and future writers and readers for many decades to come. Faulkner went beyond accepting the award on his behalf, and spoke about the keys to truly captivating a reader’s attention. In Faulkner’s words the writer was one who “writes not of love but lust, of defeats in which nobody loses anything of value, of victories without hope and, worst of all, without pity or compassion” (Faulkner). William Faulkner’s acceptance speech is a highly noted speech. Faulkner persuaded writers not to just write about common tragedies or man’s experiences, but of the emotional capabilities of the human spirit. Through parallelism, ethical and emotional appeal, and the use of a rhetorical question, William Faulkner was able to establish the importance of writing with an emotional sense.
Although, William Faulkner’s work is celebrated as a timeless literary achievement, Faulkner did not receive recognition until decades later. In a biography of Faulkner written by Cynthia Rose, Rose explains, “French literary critics were among the first to recognize Faulkner’s greatness. Understanding and appreciation in the United States lagged far behind” (Rose 1). Consequently, Faulkner came to a point in his literary career where he believed that since he would not be able to make money for his work, he would just write for his own
entertainment and satisfaction. In his leisure time, Faulkner was able to write under his own conditions.
Faulkner’s leisurely approach to writing paid grand dividends. During this span, he created some of his most celebrated works. His characters became more believable as he emphasized character emotions, making his characters more relatable to readers. Faulkner developed heart-wrenching themes that enraptured in heavenly bliss a reader’s mind. Faulkner’s themes revolved around realistic hardships such as over-whelming guilt, broken promises, ruined romances, and heart aches. Faulkner was able to grasp a reader’s attention in an exemplary novel, The Sound and the Fury. In this work, Faulkner incorporated powerful contrasts between the past and his present, new and old, and even fiction and reality (Pendergast 1).With Faulkner’s emotional-triggering themes and his use of rhetorical devices in stories, Faulkner eventually achieved praise from critics around the world. “After...

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