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A Brave New World By Aldous Huxley And George Orwell’s 1984

1433 words - 6 pages

It is a common belief that the true essence of being human is the right to exercise one’s freedom. The ability of being able to choose permits one to define himself how he sees fit; it allows each person to have his or her own individuality. Living during the same period of Adolf Hitler’s Germany in the middle of the twentieth century, Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World, an unforgiving imagination of Huxley’s worst fears of losing that freedom. In Brave New World, Huxley creates a negative utopia where the people thrive by having the World State dictate their lives through ways of mind control: mind control by the use of technology, mind control by direct control over the mind using soma, and mind control by having an all-powerful World State. The people are fully submissive to the power of the World State, and as a result, lose their individuality and freedom.
One of the World State’s main objectives is to suppress the expressive ability of the population in Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. This is done through the use of their own understanding of medicine and technology. During this era, the World State, with the assistance of their ingenious scientists, has achieved many scientific achievements such as human cloning and living longer through the use of a pill called soma. With these types of advancements the World State is able to limit people’s individuality and freedom and eventually dictate their lives. The Director, who administrates the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre, explains to a group of students how critical these advancements are and how they are a solution to mankind’s problems. The Director elaborates that the Bokanovsky Process assists social
stability because the clones it produces are preordained to perform exact tasks at identical machines, ensuring their country would grow faster, politically and socially. The cloning process is one of the methods the World State uses to enforce its motto: Community, Identity, Stability. Moreover, the World State creates a caste system, known as Hatchery- Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon- which destines each fetus for a particular caste in the World State. Mr. Foster, who is an Alpha male, explains to the students that World State decides which caste a person would be placed in. Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon are part of the lower caste; this means that they must undergo the Bokanovsky Process. This is one way in which the World State decides and controls the future of its citizens, in other words, they have already predetermined a person’s role in the society by limiting their rights before the individuals can fight for their freedom. The other two groups; however, do not undergo the Bokanovsky Process because they are part of the World State and will govern the country. In the same way, in George Orwell’s 1984, the Party suppresses the expressive ability of the population in Oceania through the use of their own developing language, Newspeak. Newspeak is...

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