A Brilliant Mind A Man, His Life, His Literature Aldous Huxley's Writing Of Brave New World, Island, Doors Of Perception And Heaven And Hell In Relation To His Life

2159 words - 9 pages

Throughout the ages of mankind, different things motivate people, directly or indirectly relating to their lives. They mold this motivation into what they wish to do, and the mark they wish to leave in life. This concept is directly related to authors, whom almost always use their life to express their feelings, their ideas, or a point they wish to make. Aldous Huxley, primarily know for his works Brave New World, Island, Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell, exemplifies this concept to the highest degree. Huxley creates novels directly pertaining to his personal experiences, family, government, and society in general. People have interpreted his works in different ways, but many of his novels are mainly straightforward and satirical, often criticizing or poking fun at one of more aspects of life. His experimentation with drugs have been a major influence in his writing, mainly portrayed in Island, Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell. Huxley uses his ideas and surroundings and melds them into magnificent works of literature that have left a major mark on society, past, present, and most definitely will leave some influence on the future, like his most famous novel Brave New World.Huxley wrote Brave New World in 1931. He creates a negative Utopian society, which has a wide variety of influences instilled within its pages. He uses themes pertaining to his life, government and society in his greatest novel.Huxley was brought up into a high-class, wealthy family. During his day, England had a very strong class structure. An even stronger class structure is shown in Brave New World, where humans were produced to be an Alpha, or a Beta, or so on, Alpha being the highest. These classes where mentally engineered to serve in their class, and would be happy serving in it. Huxley had feelings of uncertainty and hatred to this, because he was of the high class, and felt there was obligations set upon him in being in the high class. His equivocal feeling toward the class system is shown in Brave New World, where if his family lived in the society of story, they would be an Alpha. He did not believe in the class system, and uses satire to show his dislike for his government, and posts a warning to the future of mankind to not let the government control humanity.Huxley was a very intelligent and aware child who was acclaimed to have superiority to him by his brother. Huxley was love and respected by his family, but felt separated from them because of how gifted he was. In Brave New World, he shows this in the characters of Bernard Marx and Helmholtz Watson. They were both members of the elite class, but felt different, as Huxley did. He believed in the uniqueness of a person, and it is pretty much stripped away in Brave New World. He shows his dislike toward the obligation a class system provides, in almost taking away the ability to be an individual.Huxley's mother died when he was fourteen, which was another influence shown in the novel. After her...

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