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A Clockwork Orange Essay: Blindness In A Clockwork Orange

975 words - 4 pages

Blindness in A Clockwork Orange

In the novel, A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess has tried to show the importance of individual freedom over doing the right thing. He has taken an extreme example of violence and perverse acts to accent his strong belief. It is my opinion that Burgess has been blinded to some essential truths in his quest to ensure personal freedom.

Personal freedom can be described as acting upon your own accord and not becoming restricted by the social paradigm in which you live. This is definitely a noble cause, all men should have the right to choose the path of their own lives. You may have the right to choose your own actions, but you are not allowed to impose your freedom on others. This is the point at which Burgess’ supposed view becomes hypocritical. Alex has forced himself into the personal freedom of others and in doing so is no better than the state which rehabilitated him. If one imposes himself on the personal freedom of another violently, a reaction will occur.

If a rabid dog wanders around your neighborhood, do you let it continue to do so? The dog as you once knew it was an affectionate creature always playing with the children and never once threatened the mailman, but today it threatens the lives of everyone in your community. The dog’s life is ended and it is freed from it’s disease. Alex is sick much like a rabid dog, he is perverse and though it may not be his fault, much like it was not the dog’s fault of becoming rabid, his threat on others has to be neutralized.

I question the actual freedom Alex believes he has. He seems to be oppressed by his emotional sickness and perverseness. Alex is a slave to his supposed freedom, which is dictated by the feelings of the other people whose freedom he threatened. By choosing the path he did; Alex also must accept the consequences along with it; whether he wants them or not. A parallel to this is written in part three of chapter 2:

“This is not a reward. This is far from being a reward. Now, there is a form here to be signed. It says that you are willing to have the residue of your sentence commuted to submission to what is called here, ridiculous expression, Reclamation Treatment. Will you sign?” “Oh, yes sir...” p.93

Alex is so quick to agree, because he sees the chance for his freedom. The warden warns him that this is not a gift being handed to him, but instead perhaps a curse. Alex accepts this consequence much like he must accept the consequences set upon him by society for the lifestyle he chooses to live.

It is popular to argue on what is right or wrong as judged by society, and I myself believe that a lot of popular...

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