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A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court Vs. Le Morte D'arthur

579 words - 2 pages

Connecticut Yankee vs Le Morte DArthur

King Arthur’s Britain, a vastly different Britain than we know today, is revealed through many timeless classics in literature. Two of these pieces of literature are Thomas Malory’s seriously toned Le Morte D’Arthur and Mark Twain’s satirical A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. These works show distinctly different visions of the Arthurian legend. King Arthur’s Britain in Twains A Connecticut Yankee and Malory’s Morte D’Arthur may be compared through the unique portrayal of living conditions, chivalry, knightly adventures and the role of magic and mystery.

Living conditions in the Arthurian Legend are presented in distinctly different manners between A Connecticut Yankee and Le Morte D’Arthur. While the quality of life for the poor is consistently harsh for both novels, some differences do exist. The poor in A Connecticut Yankee are portrayed as a battered and oppressed race, while the poor of Le Morte D’Arthur are shown as existing more happily in the idyllic Camelot. Next, the upper class lifestyle is unanimously shown to be considerably more comfortable than that of the poorer peasants. Fancy clothing, lavish feasts, and comfortable mansions are all apart of the upper class world in the sixth century. Although the upper class had it easy, the high society in A Connecticut Yankee had another level of comfort from the nineteenth century technologies of the Yankee. The new innovations introduced by the Yankee created a differentiation between the rich societies of the two novels.

Chivalry and the knightly adventure also have some similarities and differences in the two pieces of literature. In Le Morte D’Arthur and in A Connecticut Yankee, the...

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