A Critique To “Letter From Birmingham Jail” After Years Of

920 words - 4 pages

A Critique to "Letter from Birmingham Jail" After years of segregation and inequality, one man stood up and fought for what was right. This man spoke of dreams and for what he felt as morally right, ethically right, lawfully right and emotionally right. This man spoke of freedom, brotherhood and equality among all people, no matter what race they were. He brought forth facts and emotions to America that were being felt by the black community, which was being treated so badly. This man was Martin Luther King Jr., a clergyman and civil rights leader, who later was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. King opened the eyes of America to a broader sense of understanding, to a wider view of the inequality and hate that almost every black person was having to live through at that time. After several peaceful protests King was arrested for demonstrating in defiance of a court order, by participating in a parade, he was then taken to Birmingham jail. There in the jail, King wrote a letter to 8 fellow clergymen in response to a letter they published in a newspaper. King explained in the letter why he did the things he did, and why that had to be done the way that they were. King also tried to convince the clergymen to see his views, and to realize and accept the problem as a problem, not just a disturbance. King did this in talking about common ground that they all had, about beliefs that they all believed, and feelings that they all felt.King relied on religion to help get compassion from the clergymen. Talking about what was morally and spiritually right, King tried to persuade the clergymen to look into their own hearts and find out what they felt was right. King used quotes of church apostles and even quotes out of the Bible for support of his dreams. For example, he talks about just and unjust laws and uses a quote by St. Augustine, a Christian philosopher and theologian, that says: "An unjust law is no law at all." In this example, King uses a quote by a know Christian philosopher and uses it to promote his idea, knowing that the clergymen can't just ignore the words of such a wise man. King used quotes by other known Christian philosophers and even prophets out of the bible to back up his feelings, knowing that the clergymen would understand and hopefully accept the point that King was trying to get across.King consistently brought up the point of morality. Pointing out that certain things are moral and other things aren't. For example King talked about having two different drinking fountains or having blacks...

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