A Critical Analysis Of The Place Of English

672 words - 3 pages

Introduction

English has become one of the major languages of the world, and it can be an agent of linguistic imperialism (Phillipson, 1992). This review will offer a critique of the of the 1992 book, "Linguistic Imperialism," published by New York: Oxford University Press. The author, Robert Phillipson, is a research professor at Copenhagen Business School's Department of English. Through the examination of this article, it can be confirmed that Phillipson has accurately described the existing problems of the dying minority languages and the untenable idea of the combination of globalization and English. However, I contest that English can promote social mobility in low-income countries in Africa and other countries. The questions raised are:
1. Can the equality of learning English be attained globally?
2. Does this diffusion of the English language rule affect operations in
political and econmical relations?

Summary

The article claims that English is essential to the globalization processes for economic and political restructuring, but there isn’t a fair chance for everyone to have the opportunity to master the English language. The dominance of English is in various forms of globalization, such as the military operation, and in Hollywood culture. Phillipson acknowledges that the English imperialism is present in modern-day global society, because of the massive English or British culture influenced on a global level through the dominance of English as the lingua franca. He explains that there is an obvious relation between language and the global and political influence of the United States, which leads to the increasing population of English speakers all around the world. This spread of the language is the imperialism of culture, where Americanization takes place, and American culture is forced into various cultures through the power of the dominance of English as the lingua franca.

Critical Analysis

Phillipson argues that English can be an agent of linguistic imperialism. Accoding to Phillipson, the reasons for this are due to the dominance of English is also in other forms of globalization, especially...

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