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A Cultural View Of The World

854 words - 4 pages

“He is not culturally ‘disadvantaged,’ but he is culturally ‘different.’” (Lake 111). This quote in itself proves the argument of this paper; it is saying how Wind Wolf has a different culture which effects how he views the world. Culture is something that affects the way we live; the values and opinions in which one possesses are dependent on culture. Ethnic foods, traditions celebrated, and religions are all examples of aspects influenced by culture. Surrounded by culture every day, a person’s family, ethnicity, and religion have profound effects on their view of the world.
Ethnicity is a monumental role in culture. It can have many effects on how a person acts within their own ethnic group. For instance, the climate zone in which a person resides affects their ethnicity because it influences one’s way of life. A person who lives in a rural setting lives a different lifestyle than someone in a more urban setting just as a person who lives in a colder climate lives a different lifestyle than someone in a warmer climate. Based on where they live, this effects their occupation, the clothing they wear, and how they speak. Another way ethnicity affects culture is through “ethnocentrism.” This concept means that certain ethnic groups may believe that their culture is superior to others. Therefore, there develops cultural conflicts where one sees their culture as correct and other cultures as wrong, or bad.
One way that helps people to form opinions about the world are family traditions. Without even knowing it, a family will provide knowledge and influence the way one views the world. They also help define what is “normal”. In “Matrimony with a Proper Stranger” it states, “… the tradition of arranged marriage, considering the practice perfectly normal” (Heft 86). This is saying that in Indian culture it is common for two complete strangers to become a married couple. Another aspect of how family affects one’s view of the world is through the traditions that are celebrated. Christmas, for example is a common holiday for people to celebrate with family and friends. Gifts are exchanged and most people who celebrate Christmas decorate their homes with a Christmas tree. Hanukkah is a holiday that is celebrated by Jewish people. Another example of holiday tradition is found in the story “Thanksgiving: A Personal History.” The author states, “From the mythic Midwest of my childhood, to the mesmerizing Chicago of later years, this holiday always evoked a place” (New 67.) In this she talks about how her many experiences of...

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