A Description Of Hinduism And Its Path Leading Toward The Knowledge Of Truth And Meaning In Life

898 words - 4 pages

Hinduism

A Path Toward Truth

Hinduism is an intreguing religion. It is very interesting in that when compared to one's own religion, whatever religion that be, there can be many similarities and differences drawn between the two. There is also a very deep appreciacion that the Hindu's have for their religion. They feel very strongly that if they lead their lives by following the rules of Hinduism then they will have a much greater chance to discover life's truths.

One way Hindu's go about this quest is by living according to the four basic human desires. The first basic human desire is that of pleasure. It is the most natural of the desires. Everyone is born with receptors that react to pleasure, pain, or any other feeling. Hindu's believe that if one wants pleasure, he or she should go after it. There is no wrong in doing so. However, there comes a time when most everyone desires something more than these simple pleasures. This is when the second human desire comes into effect.

This second desire is worldy successes. This is split into three categories; wealth, fame, and power. Along with pleasure, this is also a goal that should not be looked down upon. It should be a goal to strive for, if one desires to do so. In fact, it gives longer satisfaction than that of pleasure because it involves social achievement. Therefore it has an importance greater than that of pleasure. The major setback of this is that these items can not be shared without diminishing one's portion.

This is when humans strive toward finding something more meaningful than posessions. One starts to search for answers within the mind rather than with posessions. What humans first want, say the Hindu's, is being. That is to say that humans want to exist more than they do not want to exist, both individually and as a species. Genereally, nobody wants to die.

Another thing that humans srive for is a desire to know. People are inherintly curious. No matter how much one knows, he or she will always want to know more. From something simple as reading the newspaper to a scientist searching for complex answers, there is a curiosity that people need to have answered.

If one follows and embraces these four basic desires, the path toward truth will be much more straight and clear. However, if one does not rid himself of limitations, the road may become hazy once again.

There are three disctint limitations of human life. These are physical pain, ignorance, and restricted being. The positive side of these is that they are all removeable...

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