This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

A Doll’s House And Fathers And Sons

1499 words - 6 pages

Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons reflect two unique societal struggles. While both texts deal with a main character attempting to overcome society’s resistance to progress, they delineate from each other in the characters’ relative successes as well as divergent societal implications. The formal cause of these differences is ultimately societal mores as well as contrasting aims: Ibsen deals with feminism, whereas Turgenev discusses nihilism. However, both novels were written in the 19th century and dealt with local issues, where the implications beyond their respective societies were disregarded. Hence, these two texts both play an important role in their respective societies. However, these two texts are harbingers for two contrasting revolutions, where A Doll’s House and Fathers and Sons feature enlightened and darkened protagonists respectively. While both Ivan Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons and Ibsen’s A Doll’s House challenge traditional society’s thoughts and beliefs, the diction, character arcs, author’s tone and exposition reflect contrasting opinions on the successes of the two revolutionary attempts.
Both Ibsen’s and Turgenev’s texts vary in the use and role of foreign languages. While Pavel Petrovich, a main character in Fathers and Sons, is a xenophile, the experiences of Nora Torvald in A Doll’s House are very limited. Pavel’s love of foreign cultures is portrayed through his use of French words, whereas Nora lacks worldly understanding and thusly lives in the proverbial doll’s house. Pavel describes liberalism as ‘très distingué’ and says ‘bon soir’ when he goes to bed, whereas Nora emphasises the need “to reach any [some] understanding of herself and the things around her, she must learn to stand alone. That's why she can't stay here [there] with you [Helmer] any longer”. Hence, Turgenev’s text provides a worldlier outlook in direct contrast to the insular society portrayed in A Doll’s House.
Ibsen’s A Doll’s House uses more symbolic diction than Fathers and Sons in describing the dress that Nora can now take off. This directly contrasts Bazarov’s direct attack on “aristocracy, liberalism, progress and principles [… as] a lot of foreign… and useless words! (49)”. The symbolism of “taking off her fancy dress (64)” adds an additional layer to the text inexistent in Fathers and Sons. Ultimately, this helps relate Nora’s problem with appearance versus reality to the more general feminist movement and thus the play arrives at a more portable and universal conclusion, whereas Turgenev’s novel directly discusses problems inherent in Russian society in the 19th century. Hence, varying elements of specificity in diction the two texts reflects contrasting implications for both the texts and the characters within. In direct contrast to the more international outlook by Turgenev, his text is less portable to society. Ibsen’s play avoids the pluralism of many different principles and focuses on a more prevalent problem in...

Find Another Essay On A Doll’s House and Fathers and Sons

Synthesis of Ivan Turgenev's Fathers and Sons

1524 words - 6 pages Fathers and Sons by Russian author, Ivan Turgenev, is set in the Russian countryside in the mid 1900’s. The novel tells the story of a new coming belief and religion that causes a lot of tumult between the age generations in the country. The older individuals continue to follow tradition, while most of the younger generation starts believing a new belief: nihilism. We generally define nihilism as “the rejection of all religious and moral

Unfair Treatment of Women in Antigone and A Doll’s House

1668 words - 7 pages beyond just the workforce as displayed in the plays Antigone by Sophocles and A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen. Antigone is a Greek tragedy written before or in 442 BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays by Sophocles. Antigone tells the tale of a young adult woman, Antigone, who must choose between following the laws of the state or the laws of the gods. A Doll’s House takes place in the late 1800s in Norway and depicts the life of a young

Breaking Away From Society: “A Doll’s House” and “Trifles”

1698 words - 7 pages Modern interpretations of “A Doll’s House” and “Trifles” portray that these dramas are solely works of feminism, when in fact they address a more important issue of the time: marriage ideals. During this time, marriages were nothing but a masquerade. Husbands and wives hid behind their commitment, and were overly focused on the appearances and opinions of society. Society played a key role in the formation of the attitudes and opinions of

Powerful Women in Antigone and A Doll’s House

1427 words - 6 pages Doll’s House, written by Henrik Ibsen, demonstrate the interaction and roles with men and women during the 18th century. The main characters in both plays, Antigone in Antigone and Nora in A Doll’s House, show how women have struggled to find their place in the social order. They had to fight for what they wanted and face dire consequences if they disobeyed the law. Sophocles and Ibsen display the constraints placed upon women in patriarchal

The Use of Nature in Siddhartha and A Doll’s House

1570 words - 6 pages The Use of Nature in Siddhartha and A Doll’s House Herman Hesse and Henrik Ibsen make extensive references to and use of nature in their respective masterpieces, Siddhartha and A Doll’s House. This includes the use of nature as imagery, symbolism, and to create a motif. While the objects in nature do differ because of the location of the stories, there is also overlap. In Siddhartha Herman Hesse refers to two symbols of nature, birds and

Limitations on Women in A Doll’s House and Antigone

1710 words - 7 pages A recent study reported that 6.7% of the top earners of Fortune 500 Companies are women. This number can seem low and discouraging to modern eyes. However, this statistic would probably seem an unimaginable leap forward through the eyes of female characters in historical fiction. Henrik Ibsen, the author of A Doll’s House, offers a glimpse into the restrictions on women in the 1880’s, when the book was written. These include limited

Antigone and a Doll’s House: Women in Patriarchal Societies

1218 words - 5 pages ”Women have been taught that, for us, the earth is flat, and that if we venture out, we will fall of the edge”(Kramarae, Treichler). This notion is exemplified through both novels, Antigone by Sophocles, and A Doll’s House by Leo Tolstoy. Both novels provide a different look at women, with the two main characters showing qualities that weren’t common in this era such as determination, intelligence, rebellion, hubris, and stubbornness. In both

Parallels between A Doll’s House and The Awakening

1113 words - 4 pages Throughout history, society often places women inferior to men, causing women to be predisposed to obeying their husband without a second thought. However, when a woman begins to question the idea of loyalty and obedience, her eyes are often opened to the mold that she is encased in and becomes determined to break through and develop her self-potential. In Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, the main female character

Themes and Symbols in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1482 words - 6 pages “I’ve been your doll-wife here, just as at home I was Papa’a doll-child” (Ibsen 1491). Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll House tells a story of scandal and deceit set in the Victorian era. Nora Helmer is married to Torvald Helmer and she feels more like his toy than his wife. Nora had to have Torvald to be able to do anything, because of when she lived. Nora borrows money behind her husband’s back (which is illegal at this time) and tries to cover up

A Reflection on the Defeat of Power in Fathers and Sons by Turgenev

2184 words - 9 pages A Reflection on the Defeat of Power When asked about his thoughts regarding the great men and women of society, George Bernard Shaw replied, “...they don’t exist. We believe in them a lot like we used to believe in unicorns and dragons. The greatest man or woman is ninety-nine percent just like yourself” (George). This concept remains hard to keep in accord with human nature. In the novel Fathers and Sons, Russian author, Turgenev, enshrines

Examining a Doll’s House

854 words - 4 pages leave Italy after publishing Brand in 1865. This five-act tragedy depicted a clergyman losing his family and life due to his devotion to faith. This play made him famous in Scandinavia despite losing prestige in Italy. Ibsen still managed to challenge the higher orders with his works such as The Pillars of Society (1868), Ghosts (1881), An Enemy of the People (1882), Hedda Gabler (1890), and A Doll’s House (1879). He moved to Germany, ventured

Similar Essays

The Cherry Orchard And A Doll’s House

1437 words - 6 pages People bring their downfalls upon themselves. Do certain habitually practice leave them wondering what wrong they did? Torvald from Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and Madame Ranevsky from Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard are left to start afresh at the end of the plays after they neglected a key element in their lives. Torvald toys with Nora, his wife, fulfilling only his wants and only his needs and abases her; never considering her his

Infiltration And Withdrawal In A Doll’s House

1245 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, a play originally written in Norwegian during the nineteenth century, provides an excerpt of the life of Nora and Torvald Helmer. Throughout the play, the characters experience struggle with situations such as emotional conflicts, keeping secrets, conversational exploitation, and physical distractions. Ibsen manipulates clothing to signal infiltration and withdrawal with the characters. The expressions of

Justice In Antigone And A Doll’s House

1448 words - 6 pages Ibsen’s A Doll’s House since they were written in different centuries and different cultures, but at the same time both works share similarities. Ibsen does not identify a direct problem and he chooses to develop his characters and the problem as the play unfolds. Sophocles begins Antigone with a challenge directed at the power of the king. This directly identifies a problem and source of tension from the start of the play in contrast to Ibsen’s A

Social Criticism Is Turgenev's "Fathers And Sons"

693 words - 3 pages Events which Turgenev describes in the novel, happen in the middle of the nineteenth century. That was time when Russia experienced the next epoch of reforms. In fact, "Fathers and sons" maintains reformism but he describes the very exact problems, inevitably connected with it. The main problem put by the writer in the novel, already sounds in its name: "Fathers and sons ". This name has double sense. On the one hand, it is a problem of