A Doll’s House By Henrik Isben

2124 words - 8 pages

A Doll's House

Often in literature characters are presented as victims of society. There are many examples of this in Henrik Ibsen’s controversial play, “A Doll’s House”. Written during the Victorian era, Ibsen’s play would have raised a lot controversy on the roles of males and females in society. The audience would have noticed the constant similarities between themselves and the characters that are presented as victims of society. A lot of the audience would have found the play shocking and disturbing.

Torvald, a character who is a typical Victorian era husband, with a sweet wife, three children, a nanny, a maid and a well paid job; would have represented a large percentage of the play’s male audience. Only people, who were well off as Torvald, could go to the theatre and have such luxuries, in that period of time.

Torvald is a victim of society, forced by the need to fit into society’s circle and to be classified as high in social status. Torvald is aware of the pressures of society and is willing to adhere to them. Although Torvald is a victim of society, it’s quite evident that he is happy and comfortable with the idea.

Torvald has everything he could possibly want, and everything society could possibly expect him to have, in life. A family, a beautiful wife, a home, a good respectable job, which has given him a higher status in society, a office of his own, to do his man to man business, and plenty of money so that he can spoil his pet, Nora. This is the major reason why Torvald does not want to do anything such as “touch any case that isn’t - well - nice” in case it affects his image and gives his name a bad reputation. Torvald would do anything to stop having to “cut costs to an absolute minimum” and “save every cent”, ever again. This is evident in the last scene when he tries to cover up Nora’s actions, so it doesn’t leave a bad mark against his name. “ I must try to buy him off somehow. This thing must be hushed up at any price.” (Act3, pg94)

Torvald tries his best to live up to every expectation society sets for him. The idea of maintaining a strong and crucial role in the family, is an image, which is important to Torvald. He feels if he maintains this image, he will be comfortably similar to everybody else, in society. As the male and husband of the family, he feels that it is his duty to be the breadwinner, the provider and the head of the household. “you will not find me lacking in strength or courage. I am a man enough to bear the burden for us both.” (Act 2, pg63)

In Act 3, we are able to see how the affects of society have taken the toll on Torvald's moral thoughts. It would kill Torvald, to know that society was aware of Nora’s actions. Torvald would feel ashamed that his own wife had to support him and save his life. “he’s so proud of being a man- it’d be so painful and humiliating for him to know that he owed anything to me (Nora).” Society works in the opposite way, the man is to support his family...

Find Another Essay On A Doll’s House by Henrik Isben

Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House Essay

1354 words - 5 pages Everlasting First Impression: Misleading First Impressions of Characters in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House A character’s introduction reveals the personality, attitude, and physical features of that individual. This first impression sets the emotional reaction to that character when ever he or she appears in the story. The certain mannerisms the author makes a character use, and the way others treat and react to the new character, demonstrate...

Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House Essay

1055 words - 4 pages In Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll House the main character, Nora Helmer, shows us the story of a woman who has borrow money without her husband’s consent in order to save his life. Although this noble act would be admired by most, Nora has to keep it a secret from Torvald Helmer, her husband, as he would see it as a betrayal. The measures that Nora takes in order to keep the loan a secret, create circumstances that bring Nora—whose only duty is to serve...

Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1527 words - 6 pages Societal appearance and acceptance is an utmost characteristic an average individual tends to underestimate. It may seem as if individual morals go against the social appearance, but in value, individuals perceive a need for an appearance to convey a sense of belonging. Within two diverse yet similarly realist drama's, A Doll’s House and Death of a Salesman societal appearance’s stands above all else. Henrick Ibsen's A Doll's House embarks on the...

Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House - 963 words

963 words - 4 pages What comes to mind when the word morals is said? Whose morals should be followed, individual or group? In A Doll House, Ibsen portrays the protagonist, Nora, to follow the morals of her husband, Torvald. Four key aspects that help Nora decide to change her mind and make a decision to leave Torvald. These include the constant change of nicknames, the questioning of her own independence, the questioning of Torvald's love, and the realization...

Facades in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1309 words - 5 pages When a young girl plays with her doll house, she imagines a make-believe world full of enchantment. However, little does she realize the false and unattainable image of perfection that lies before her. With every miniature doorway and elaborate bookcase, the doll house disguises reality with a mask of flawless excellence. Similarly, Henrik Ibsen describes many appearances in A Doll House as mere façades of deception. These images...

Influence of Patriarchy in A Doll’s House is a play written by Henrik Ibsen

1534 words - 6 pages A Doll’s House is a play written by Henrik Ibsen. Set in the late eighteen hundreds, the play depicts a well off family living in Norway. As the play begins the reader meets Nora, a childish young women who loves to spend money and make sure everyone knows it. Her husband Torvald appears from his study and instantly one sees the type of relationship that the two share. Torvald speaks to Nora in such a way that gives the impression that he does...

Transformation and Self-Realization in the Play “A Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen

1265 words - 5 pages “A Doll’s House” In the play “A Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen, Nora goes through a transformation of self-realization. Nora lives a doll-like existence. she responds lovingly to her husband’s pet names such as “my little lark” or “my little squirrel” (Ibsen, 793). She does not mind playing a role for her husband. As the play progresses, Nora show that she is not a little girl. She understands how business work by taking out a loan behind her...

The Importance of Truth in A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen

1253 words - 5 pages Though unknown to the outside world, many seemingly perfect relationships are dark moral places to investigate. We constantly see idealistic relationships that appear flawless at first glance; however, we are too taken aback when we discover such relationships are based on deception. In A Doll House, Henrik Ibsen contends through Nora that truth plays a crucial role in idealistic living; and when idealistic lifestyles are built on deceit an...

The Theme of Escape in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1150 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House”, a tragic play set in the late 1800’s, is one women’s realization of her life as merely that of a doll living out her life as an object in a world dominated by the males around her. Ibsen points the reader in the right direction to the deeper meaning of the play in the title. The title “A Doll’s House”, a metaphor, causes the reader or watcher of the play to think what deeper meaning lies ahead. The play takes...

The Theme of Feminism in Henrik Ibsen’s "A Doll’s House"

2867 words - 11 pages This paper will analyze the theme of the dependent women in this play. In order to do this I will discuss the following subject area. These subject areas are: female passivity; her economic and social dependence, and her dependence through her children. In A Doll’s House, Ibsen argues that a dependent woman will be passive and unwilling to speak her mind. She will not try to understand the abstract reality of life, unless it contain to her...

The Masquerade in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1014 words - 4 pages    In A Doll House, Ibsen presents us with Torvald and Nora Helmer, a husband and wife who have lived together for eight years and still don't know each other. This rift in their relationship, caused in part by Torvald's and Nora's societally-induced gender roles and also by the naivete of both parties to the fact that they don't truly love one another, expands to a chasm by the end of the play, ultimately causing Nora to leave Helmer....

Similar Essays

A Doll’s House By Henrik Isben

1162 words - 5 pages A Doll’s House by Henrik Isben A Doll’s House by Henrik Isben is about a young woman and her life. The main characters name is Nora Helmer. She is married to a bank manager named Trovald. In the early years of their marriage just after their first child Trovald becomes ill. Doctors say that he will not live unless he goes abroad immediately. Nora takes it upon herself and borrows two hundred and fifty pounds from a money leader named Krogstad....

A Doll’s House By Henrik Ibsen

1327 words - 5 pages In Henrik Ibsen’s dramatic play A Doll’s House there are many characters that have grown to be adults that they either do not wish to be or that they are expected to be. The character breakdown as the play goes from act to act is apparent. From a woman struggling to be the perfect wife and mother to a husband trying to be perfect and surround himself with people that are likewise we see that it is much harder to put on a mask to be something you...

A Doll’s House By Henrik Ibsen

947 words - 4 pages Henrik Ibsen, author of one of the greatest drama plays A Doll House, is said this piece of work is a feminist play. Feminism is defined as a “collection of movements aimed at defining, establishing and defending equal political, economic, and social rights and equal opportunities for women”, according to Dictionary.com. Did Ibsen produce A Doll House to be a feminist play? No matter what or how much propaganda feminist have made toward A Doll...

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll’s House Essay

1388 words - 6 pages A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen is a realistic drama that explores how the imbalanced treatment of women can dictate who they become. Nora Helmer embodies the need for evolution in regards to women and their roles within the family. The importance of this play, which was written in 1879, is still relevant in the modern world. This play helps to bring attention to the characters people play as a result of their circumstances. The...