A Doll's House Essay

912 words - 4 pages

A play serves as the author's tool for judging society. Someone rarely encounters the ability to change accepted social beliefs. The play reflects controversial issues that the audience can relate to because they deal with the same situations every day. As late nineteenth century playwriter, Hendrick Ibsen points out the flaws of mankind and also gives an answer to the controversey.Unknowingly the heroine solves the problem at the end of the play and indirectly sends a message to the audience on how to solve their own problems. Hendrick Ibsen provides a unique analysis on the issues that his culture never thought as being wrong.In the play "A Doll's House", Ibsen tackles women's rights as a matter of importance being neglected. In this play he acknowledges the fact that in nineteenth century European life, the role of the women was to stay home, raise the children, and attend to her husband.The before mentioned problem is solved through the playwright's recommendations and the actions of the characters . In the play "A Doll's House", the author uses realism to present a problem and solution to controversial societal issues.While "A Doll's House" mainly concentrates on the negative aspects of culture, there are positive facets looked in by the author. Ibsen focuses on the lack of power and authority given to women, but through Nora demonstrates the strength and willpower hidden by her husband Torvald. To save her husband's life Nora secretly forges her father's signature and receives a loan to finance a trip to Italy. Nora's naivete of the law puts her in a situation that questions her morality and dedication. Nora is not aware that under the law she is a criminal. She believes that her forgery is justified through her motive.She is not a criminal like Krogstad, because his crime was simply a moral failing and not for the good of his family. A morally unjustified crime is the only type of crime.Nora's believes that her love for her husband is what pushed her to sign her father's name and pass it off as his own. Nora's motive is to save him from pain and humiliation. If he knew, it would hurt his "manly independence" and upset Nora and Torvald's "mutal relations". Nora knows that without forging her father's signature she would not be able to save her husband. Nora uses her wit too find a way to be able to overcome the shackles placed on her by society and get enough money to save Torvald's life. The sacrifices made by Nora are far outweighed by the actions of her counterparts. Torvald sees Nora's only role as being the subserviet and loving wife. He...

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