"A Woman's Place" Essay

855 words - 3 pages

In the world before the twenty-first century, women were expected to fulfill many duties that would be viewed as “subservient to men” by many women of today’s world. Even so, there has always been one position that only a woman could fulfill the best and this was a role rightly appropriated to women. Before the twenty-first century, a woman’s main role in society was to be a mother; a viewpoint that is supported by quotes from the novels Animal Farm and Les Miserables and the play ”Antigone”. Throughout world literature, there is a consensus on the viewpoint that there is no adequate substitution for a woman when it comes to motherhood.As the narrator introduces the characters in the novel Animal Farm, there are two mares that are introduced. One is Mollie, a spoiled, selfish mare who is contradictory to nearly all of the traits Clover possesses. Clover, on the other hand, is a gentle, motherly mare of about middle age, already having borne four foals. “The two horses had just lain down when a brood of ducklings, which had lost their mother, filed into the barn, cheeping feebly and wandering from side to side to find some place where they would not be trodden on. Clover made a sort of wall round them with her great foreleg, and the ducklings nestled down inside it and promptly fell asleep.” (Orwell 2) Here we see Clover exemplifying a woman who has always performed her most important role in society. She is gentle and protective of the young orphan ducklings. Clover does this out of her intuition as a mother.There have always been certain qualities that could define the typical pre-twenty first century mother. They tend to be tender and gentle to the youth. Their children feel amazingly secure with their mother; a security unlike that under any other circumstance. This quality definitive of a woman is seen in a plethora of works of world literature such as Les Miserables. In one part near the beginning of the novel, a woman named Fantine is introduced. She is a hardworking, stressed mother. Even so, among the first depictions of Fantine the narrator provides deals with her motherhood. “[The child] was sleeping in the absolutely confiding slumber peculiar to her age. Mothers’ arms are made of tenderness, and sweet sleep blesses the child who lies therein”. (Hugo 88) A woman’s most important role is entirely portrayed here as a loving and tender mother. One might figure that without the mother, the child would be alone and unloved. The child feels absolutely...

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