A Glimpse At The Holocaust Essay

1052 words - 4 pages

For some, it seems that the Holocaust in another lifetime, but for others it will be something they will never forget. Holocaust was a time for fighting. The Jewish would fight for the right to live as they were killed solely for being Jewish. The Holocaust began in 1939 and would continue through 1945. It was introduced by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, although he did not act alone. His mission would be to “exterminate” all minorities, but most abundantly, the Jews. Based on information given by About.com, it is estimated that 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust. Six million of these were Jews.
The Holocaust began in 1933 when the Nazis instigated their first action against the Jews by announcing a boycott of all Jewish-run businesses. The Nuremberg Laws went into place on September 15, 1935 which began to exclude the Jews from public life. These laws went to the extent of stripping German Jews of the citizenship and then implemented a prohibition of marriage between the Jewish and the Germans. These laws set the legal precedent for further anti-Jewish legislation. Over the next several years, even more laws would be introduced. Jews would be excluded from parks, fired from civil service jobs, required to register all property and restricted Jewish doctors from practicing medicine on any person other than Jewish patients.
It is told that on the night of November 9 and early November 10, 1938, Nazis incited a pogrom against the Jewish in Austria and Germany. It is termed, “Kristallnact” (“Night of Broken Glass). This night of violence included pillaging and burning of synagogues, breaking of the windows in Jewish owned businesses, looting, and physically attacking of Jewish people. Approximately, 30,000 Jew were arrested and sent to concentration camps.
After World War II started, the Nazis began ordering the Jewish people to wear a yellow Star of David on their clothing so they could be easily recognized and targeted. The Jewish were forced out of their homes and into smaller apartments, often with other families and required to live within very specific areas of the city called ghettos. Initially, some ghettos were open and they Jews were allowed to leave during the day as long as they returned before curfew. Later on, the ghettos became “closed” and the Jewish people were trapped within the confines and were not allowed to leave. The largest ghetto was in Warsaw, with its highest population reaching near 445,000 in 1941.
Most ghettos were mandated to establish a Judenrat (Jewish Council) which served the purpose of administering Nazi demands and to regulate the life in the confines of the ghetto. Later, Nazi’s would order deportations from the ghettos. Some of the larger ghettos would lose up to 1000 people per day which would be transported by train and either sent to death camps order concentration camps. To help enforce cooperation from the Jews, the Nazis would tell them that were being transported to...

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