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A Letter Explaining Relationships In The Loman Family In "Death Of A Salesman"

822 words - 3 pages

I hope that this letter of mine would find you in best of health and spirits. I am really sorry that I couldn't come home this time. Instead I went to visit Aunt Linda's house and I just got back from there. During my stay at her house I experienced some very interesting things about their family as it was my first time visiting them. When I reached their house Uncle Willy was not at home. I think he was away for some work business. Aunt Linda, Biff and Happy seemed to be really nice people. They are quite hostile. They seemed to be enjoying all the time, cheerful and happy. Smiles were always on their faces, but Happy was ignored by almost everyone and it seemed like he didn't even want anyone's company. I tried to initiate a conversation with him quite a few time but he just walked away. Aunt Linda took good care of me and even though the family was going though financial crisis she never made me feel that. She cooked really nice dinner for me and we even had a turkey for dinner. But this didn't go on for too long. One day we were at the table and Uncle Willy finally arrived home. I was so excited to see him but the family didn't seem to be really happy after seeing him. Biff walked away from the dinner table as soon as his dad joined us and Aunt Linda started acting to be more formal with everyone. She was the only one who actually greeted Uncle Willy properly. There was a change in everyone's behavior. Uncle Willy always craved for attention like a kid and I don't know what used to happen to him at once. He lived in a world of his own. He was lost his in own memories and doesn't want to listen to anyone most of the time. He would just start talking about past as if it is happening to him right now. He has very strong feelings for Biff. He either hates him to the extreme or believes that Biff is the only one who can fulfill his dreams. Uncle Willy is refusing to believe the truth about Biff and always mocks him about his laziness even when Biff tried to tell him that he just wanted to work in the farms. But Uncle Willy believes that success comes from being well liked, and he instilled his belief in...

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