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A Light Of Hope During The Vietnam War

704 words - 3 pages

The American public begged for a way out, a light of hope to end the Vietnam War. Protesters lined the streets to proclaim how desperately they wanted soldiers back home. The government spent a huge amount of money, and many soldiers fought for their lives daily in battle. In the midst of the worst part of the war, a man named Richard Nixon came forth to stand as America’s light of hope. “Vietnamization” was Nixon’s ticket into the Oval Office, however; the implementation of his policy and the outcome of the war displeased some Americans.
Nixon noticed that America had drawn close to opening the door to the longest war involvement in American history, so he took advantage of it. Nixon announced to the American public that he had a plan to get them out of the Vietnam War. Nixon’s plan was to get U.S. troops out of Vietnam, and replace them with ARVN (South Vietnam troops). This policy was named Vietnamization and was the main reason Richard Nixon became president. Nixon happened to gain office when the war was at its worst. “I have chosen a plan for peace,” Nixon says to the public as he reassures the Vietnamization policy will work. Nixon insures American citizens that around 35,000 soldiers would return home by December of 1972. Nixon did not come up with this policy by himself; he had help from a man named Henry Kissinger. Nixon knew the American people would not agree with everything the policy withheld, therefore; he had to limit the amount of information he released on the policy.
Different types of tactics were used by Nixon to preform the Vietnamization policy. Nixon took a violent route by bombing North Vietnam repeatedly (Campbell). Also the amount of weapons and troops rose drastically after Nixon got elected into office (Senker 29). Many American troops taught South Vietnam troops different war strategies to fight against the north (Johnson). Not all evasive actions made by Nixon consisted of violence. Nixon met with President Nguyen in Vietnam to discuss matters about the war (Benson, Brannen, Valentine 1154). This did not side well though; due to the fact the...

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