A Literary Analysis Of Three Lessons Learned In Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

727 words - 3 pages

Throughout our lives, we learn many different lessons. Whether it is a lesson learned from your consequences, like doing drugs, or getting a speeding ticket for driving too fast in a school zone, everyone learns lessons in their lives. One lesson that I have learned in particular is when I didn’t ask permission to go hang out with friends. My parents were both at work, and I couldn’t get contact either of them, so I decided on my own that I should be able to hang out with some friends because I had nothing to do, and they would never find out if I got back home in time before they returned from work. This was probably the stupidest thing ever, because for some reason, my parents came home early, and they found out, so I had to face the consequences, and learned some life lessons. In Samuel Taylor Colderidge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the old man learns three lessons.
In Colderidge’s poem, Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the ...view middle of the document...

These lines said by the Mariner tell about how he learned that he must care for other people, by going to church with them, and praying for them.
The next lesson that is learned by the Mariner in Colderidge’s poem is that all life is precious. Again, the Mariner learns the lesson due to the loss of all of his crew, but also because of other things. Another reason that he learned this lesson is because he killed an Albatross that was flying around his ship, in result of this, he was cursed! In lines 614- 615 of Colderidge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the Mariner states, “He prayeth best, who loveth best, all things both great and small” By this, the Mariner means that all life is valuable, both the small and large. We should all learn to value all life, because someday, we may not be able to have the living things that we have right now. One example of this is when people in places in Africa poach, it can cause extinction, and then we can never get those animals back!
The Mariner learns a lesson that teaches him to show respect to all life in Colderidge’s poem, Rime of the Ancient Mariner. By being cursed to killing an albatross, the Mariner was cursed and he lost every single one of his crew men. This must have taught the old man to respect all life. If he wouldn’t have killed the albatross, and respected the creature, he might not have been cursed, and forced to in the end tell his story all over the world to select people in order to relieve his pain. “For the dear God who loves us, He made and loveth all” (Lines 616-617). These lines state that God created all, and he loves all. In the same way, we the people are called to act as God does, so therefore, we should respect and love all life!
In conclusion, the Mariner from the poem learns many lessons. The first lesson that he learns is that he must live his life thoughtfully. The second lesson that the mariner in Colderidge’s poem learns is that all life is precious. The last lesson that is learned by the old man in the story is the he needs to show respect to all life. After all of the things that he old man goes through in the poem, I wouldn’t be surprised if his life was completely changed, and he became a better person in the end.

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