Totalitarian Society In George Orwell´S 1984

1677 words - 7 pages

Although the internet has been one humanities most important and groundbreaking inventions, it creates a totalitarian society. With the internet comes the ability to tap into an infinite net of knowledge that is available to anyone with a device that can connect to it. However, with these vast benefits also come grave dangers. The internet poses a large threat to individual privacy and freedom of expression that has existed in the United States for hundreds of years. The brains of humans are being re-wired with the ‘external brain’ that has been forced into our lives. Although more information is available, humans are becoming closed minded and limited in thought. The internet has replaced society as being a source of influence and control that will significantly shape future generations. George Orwell’s novel, 1984, has again become relevant with the emergence of the internet. The internet has led to the realization of George Orwell’s nightmare: the creation of a totalitarian society. In 1984, control was achieved by using language to limit thought, therefore the internet may be used to control the access of information in order to shape society and limit ideas.
The internet has proven to be a medium that has led an international revolution towards uniformity in thought and actions. The Google search engine is used by over 65% of internet users worldwide (Infographic). As a result, people who search specific topics around the world will read the same articles. Therefore, one gathers similar information and this prevents one from picking and choosing what he/she wants to read. By sorting the sources, Google presents only those that they believe apply to the viewer, therefore, limiting ones freedom by showing the same results for that specific topic worldwide. The internet helps create uniformity and limit personal freedom of thought. In it’s brief history, the internet has halted any notion of freedom and creativity through increased censorship and governmental surveillance. In 1984, the government can see what everyone’s doing in their own home. This has become applicable in the age of computers because governmental agencies like the NSA have the ability to monitor personal computers and phone calls. With countries in Asia censoring internet activity and social networking sites, the fear of the internet’s misuse is real. The ideological notion of a web where people can question and seek information without having to worry about privacy issues is simply non-existent. The break down of civil liberties through the monitoring of social media and censorship has led the internet to bring out George Orwell’s ‘nightmare.’
The common perception of the internet is that it’s an open forum through which one can connect with friends and contribute to on-going debates in a virtual world. On one hand, the internet has allowed us to connect with people around the world and learn from them, however, as society begins to further rely on the internet for...

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