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A Parody Of Hawthorne's "The Young Goodman Brown" Written For My Interpretation Of The Lit Class.

938 words - 4 pages

All four of us anxiously peered through the transparent door. The white,shiny tiled floor barely peeked through all of the spread out fur balls. Assoon as my father's work boots tapped the floor, all the tiny bodiesscurried away like ants after having their home destroyed. All of themaccept one lazy, lonely, runt that just barely lifted his head and blinkedhis oval bronze eyes at us. Then he slowly gained his balance and crept overand plopped down in between my father's boots. His ears were floppy, and hiswormlike tongue just plopped out of his mouth while he panted constantly.The puppy's coat was almost jet black, except for his ears that were tippeda burnt sienna. His paws were no bigger than my three-year-old thumbs andhead no bigger than my palm as I stroked and patted him. My mother andfather, with eyes shimmering, glanced at my brother and I, as our familyknew this was definitely the canine we were looking for.At the time, there was a sappy kids dog movie that my brother and I watchedquite often, "Milo and Otis." The dog that co-starred in the movie was namedOtis. This seemed to suit our family's fancy, so we now decided ourfull-blooded German shepherd's name was going to be "Otis." It's funny how aname can characterize a pet so much more than you think. After having pickedout a name, and Otis beginning to catch on, his personality really startedto show through. He was a very playful and joyous dog. You could tell fromthe beginning that Otis had a certain intelligence about him, which made himso human-like. Which in part is why he was a fifth member of our family. Wewould do everything together. Otis and I had adventures in our mowed overcornfield, and we would visit my grandma down the road everyday. It wasreally as if I had a best friend that would always thoughtfully listen towhat I had to say. Someone that would cheer me up by just being soinvigorated to see me, and the wet lather, no matter how gross, from histongue that was a warm reassurance of an everlasting friendship. We evengrew up together. As he got older his appearance changed, as did mine. Hisface became larger, with a palette of browns and grays stroked away from hisface. His ears now pointed like the tops of pyramids, along with hisraccoon-like tail that swayed between his legs every step he took. From hisbroad tan chest to his long hind legs, he truly was a magnificent creature.Especially in the winter when his coat was rich and full of spiked blacksand tans. In the summers I didn't like his look as much, because of thenever-ending clumps of fluffy hair that I would just yank out hours at atime, making him look skinny and weak. Being...

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