This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

A Poetic Approach To Racial Equality

934 words - 4 pages

"I, Too Sing America" is one of many poems written by Langston Hughes that focuses on African American culture. Written in the 20th century, America was moving toward the climax of the civil rights movement. "I, Too Sing America" responds to "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman. Langston Hughes became famous during the Harlem Renaissance because of his many poems written about African American lifestyle. This particular poem looks into what many black people hoped their future would look like. This poem uses direct language coupled with a hopeful and patriotic tone to help the reader understand his passion for equality among blacks and whites.
Hughes originally wrote this poem in response to Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." Whitman, a white author, focused on the patriotism and joyful spirits of current American people. For example, he says "The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly, Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs." He describes different American jobs while using a gleeful and patriotic tone. Whitman published this poem in 1855, at a time when immigrants segregated themselves away from other Americans and many black people were not totally free of slavery. Whitman does not mention African-Americans or any type of immigrants in his poem. Hughes, however, promotes wider equality. Hughes writes in response reminding the people that African-Americans are just as much apart of this American dream culture that Whitman describes.
Along with making this poem as a response to Whitman, Hughes uses direct words and language to emphasize his point. The first stanza is six lines and talks about the current discrimination between whites and blacks. Hughes uses assonance between similar words in the second and third lines. The assonance highlights words that point out what the speaker is experiencing in the white household. There is also parallel anapest meter between the last three lines of that stanza. This meter helps emphasize the positive words that prove that the "darker brother" grew stronger regardless of the way people treated him. The accented words all point out that the speaker of the poem was not fazed by the unfair discrimination. Along with this parallel meter, Hughes uses short and direct sentences in this poem. He does this because he has a direct point and he wants all the white Americans to understand that the African Americans are patriotic and want a place in the country. The direct language allows the reader to grasp Hughes' main idea of racial equality.
The second stanza is a look into the future of America, and Hughes' hopes. He uses hopeful phrases like "I'll be." He is certain that America will change. He has...

Find Another Essay On A Poetic Approach to Racial Equality

A Natural Approach to Migraines Essay

2073 words - 8 pages A Natural Approach to Migraines Research has shown surprising links between migraines and food. Certain foods can cause migraines, while others can prevent or even treat them. Coffee, for example, can sometimes knock out a migraine and foods rich in magnesium, calcium, complex carbohydrates, and fiber have been used to cure migraines. Some reports suggest that ginger-the ordinary kitchen spice-may help prevent and treat migraines with none of

A New Approach to a Healthier Future

1246 words - 5 pages certain diseases (e.g. hypertension, diabetes). The EOSS helps health care professionals determine which patient’s do not need to lose weight at all. This in turn will reduce health care costs. Lastly, I recommend a shift in the approach to obesity prevention by emphasising Health at Every Size (HAES). HAES promotes weight maintenance and body acceptance. It also supports the reliance on internal processes, such as hunger and satiety instead of

Racial Injustice In To Kill A Mockingbird

1303 words - 5 pages To Kill a Mockingbird, by Nelle Harper Lee, was written in 1960. During the 1960's great movements towards equality and integration were taking place, there was great social injustice towards African-Americans. This was Lee's entire plot of the book he wanted to show how even when all evidence proofed a black man innocent when his word is faced the that of a white person or person of the privileged society, he will be found guilty. In To Kill a

Racial Injustice in To Kill a Mockingbird

1357 words - 5 pages In a desperate attempt to save his client, Tom Robinson, from death, Atticus Finch boldly declares, “To begin with, this case should never have come to trial. This case is as simple as black and white” (Lee 271). The gross amounts of lurid racial inequality in the early 20th century South is unfathomable to the everyday modern person. African-Americans received absolutely no equality anywhere, especially not in American court rooms. After

Racial Discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird

588 words - 2 pages To kill a mockingbird is an extremely powerful book highlighting the horrors of racial discrimination in the “Deep South” of the United States of America. Discuss. To kill a mockingbird is an extremely powerful book highlighting the horrors of racial discrimination in the “Deep South” of the United States of America. It focuses on the racial issues concerning a staunch, typically “white” country town in the “Deep South.” This essay

To Kill a Mockingbird - Racial Issues

1455 words - 6 pages everyone is your neighbour. For in the bible it says, "Love thy neighbour as you love yourself " Love knows no boundaries or distinctions. The story of the Samaritan's compassion is a model for everybody. Racial origins were irrelevant in this passage; the test was which one loved his neighbour as himself.Roman Catholics believe that Jesus made everyone how he wanted them to be and this in turn means that every single person is equal regardless of

A Practical Approach to Television Violence

2521 words - 10 pages A Practical Approach to Television ViolenceAs difficult as this issue is, I believe it can beaddressed. My report shows that some progress has already begun inseveral areas. Attention needs to be focused on how and why someprogramming has begun to move in the right direction and why the resthas not. 'What this issue needs, more than anything else, is cool headson all sides of the problem: the network executives, the creativecommunity, the

A Systems Approach to Small Group Interaction

2816 words - 11 pages A Systems Approach to Small Group Interaction Introduction For the purposes of this assignment I will be discussing a group of which I am a part of in my place of employment. In my career as an employee of the State of California working for the Department of Transportation—CalTtrans, I am involved with district-wide accident prevention committee. This committee referred to as the DAPC, is comprised Of members of management, as well

A Practical Approach to Television Violence

2792 words - 11 pages A Practical Approach to Television Violence As difficult as this issue is, I believe it can be addressed. My report shows that some progress has already begun in several areas. Attention needs to be focused on how and why some programming has begun to move in the right direction and why the rest has not. "What this issue needs, more than anything else, is cool heads on all sides of the problem: the network executives, the creative

A Holistic Approach to Ambulatory Care

1358 words - 6 pages It is apparent that treatment with pharmaceutical drugs is not always the preference of the patient. In order for the delivery of care to be patient centered, a holistic approach to care needs to be a standard in ambulatory care. This change would enable the assurance that patients are presented with all options available and enable them to take control of their health. The Journal of Dietary Supplements discusses the increased use of

A Systems Approach to the Employment Process

2630 words - 11 pages the employment process form an interconnected web where any changes in one phase will undoubtedly influence other phases. Or to put it more simply, it boils down to a systems approach to looking at the employment process. 3. A systematic approach to human resources needs The main problem that Monomotapa Mining has to deal with at the moment is the lack of a systematic procedure for anticipating and responding to their human resource needs. This

Similar Essays

A Peaceful Approach To Equality Essay

1772 words - 8 pages during the massacre of East St. Louis in 1917 (White, Bay, and Martin 2012, 501). Unlike the violence, which the whites had utilized in their demonstration, the black population took the opposite approach and joined together in a wholly peaceful protest. Nearly 10,000 black Americans, inclusive of men, women, and children, dressed themselves completely in white and united together to march silently down Fifth Avenue in New York City (White, Bay

A Peaceful Approach To Equality Essay

1032 words - 5 pages the massacre of East St. Louis in 1917 (White, Bay, and Martin 2012, 501). Unlike the violence, which the whites had utilized in their demonstration, the black population took the opposite approach and joined together in a wholly peaceful protest. Nearly 10,000 black Americans, inclusive of men, women, and children, dressed themselves completely in white and united together to march silently down Fifth Avenue in New York City (White, Bay, and

A Worn Path: Struggle For Racial Equality

1502 words - 6 pages able to walk all the way to town because she is so old. Welty uses this hunter to show how white men used to think of black people when the story was written. They tended to always look down on them for their color and illiteracy. Another character, the big, black dog, symbolizes all the black extremists in the world who seem to take racial equality too far. “A black dog with a lolling tongue came up out of the weeds by the ditch… [she was

A Writer's Approach To Death Essay

870 words - 3 pages A Writer's Approach to Death Although death seems to be a theme for many literary poems, it also appears to be the most difficult to express clearly. Webster’s Dictionary defines the word “death” as, “A permanent cessation of all vital function: end of life.” While this definition sounds simple enough, a writer’s definition goes way beyond the literal meaning. Edwin Arlington Robinson and Robert Frost are just two examples of poetic