This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man

5843 words - 23 pages

"Victims of Hospitality": Joyce, Colonialism and the Question of Strangers in Dubliners Dipanjan Maitra Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India
Abstract The paper attempts to interrogate the ambivalence intrinsic to the 'Irish turn' in Joyce scholarship understood not only as a belated 'homecoming' of the 'high modernist' apolitical exile but also as an act of 'reclaiming' on the part of Irish Joyceans. By exploring Joyce's critical writings on Irish politics the essay tries to examine the role of strangers and the theme of hospitality in Joyce's fiction especially Dubliners (1914) to bring into focus Joyce's understanding of the notion of 'hospitality' to further explore the concepts of 'foreign-ness' and thereby of an essential 'Irish-ness' as well.
Key words: James Joyce, Dubliners, colonialism, hospitality, strangers.]
I. 'Semicolonial' Joyce
The 1990s witnessed an 'Irish turn' in Joycean criticism. It is true that Colin McCabe's classic James Joyce: New Perspectives or the earlier Revolution of the Word had already contained essays by prominent Irish Joyce scholars, but it was definitely with the publication of works like Vincent Cheng's Joyce, Race and Empire or Enda Duffy's Subaltern Ulysses or Emer Nolan's James Joyce and Nationalism that Joyce's position as a major postcolonial wrier was established. Towering over these was Declan Kiberd's monumental Inventing Ireland. Kiberd's edition of the Penguin Ulysses was accompanied by Terence Brown's edition of A Portrait. The very title of a work like Our Joyce suggests that a certain 'reclaiming' is taking place in Joycean studies. Long before Joyce had 'returned' to Ireland by a commodius vicus of recirculation, Joyce's reputation as one of the giants of Modernist fiction was firmly established in America or France thanks to the efforts of scholars like Richard Ellmann, Hugh Kenner, Harry Levin, Valéry Larbaud and of course Jacques Aubert. By the time Julia Kristeva commented on the 'gracehoping' anti-Mallarmé, Derrida had already acknowledged his debt to Joyce in at least two major studies, while Lacan had inaugurated the path breaking 1975 Paris Symposium on Joyce with his masterly Joyce le Symptôme (Kristeva 167-180; Derrida, "Two Words for Joyce" 145-160; Derrida, "Ulysses Gramophone" 253-308; Lacan 21-36). It may not be presumptuous to state therefore that this 'Irish turn' represents the latest of these scholarly approaches to Joyce. However the very admission of Joyce into the already vast list of postcolonial authors, thinkers,
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities (ISSN 0975-2935), Vol.3 No.4, 2011. Ed. Tirtha Prasad Mukhopadhyay URL of the Issue: http://rupkatha.com/v3n4.php URL of the article: http://rupkatha.com/V3/n4/16_James_Joyce_Dubliners_Colonialism.pdf Kolkata, India. © www.rupkatha.com

587 Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities 3.4
posits a problem. As the editors of the volume titled Semicolonial Joyce...

Find Another Essay On A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Comparing The Dead and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

3433 words - 14 pages The Dead and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man   Unlike the preceding stories in Dubliners, which convey the basic theme of paralysis, "The Dead" marks a departure in Joyce's narrative technique.  As one critic notes, in this final story of Dubliners:  "The world of constant figures has become one of forces that, in relation to each other, vary in dimension and direction" (Halper 31).  Epstein has offered some insight into Joyce's

The Esthetic Theory and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1405 words - 6 pages The Esthetic Theory and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man    In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Dedalus defines beauty and the artist's comprehension of his/her own art. Stephen uses his esthetic theory with theories borrowed from St. Thomas Aquinas and Plato. The discourse can be broken down into three main sections: 1) A definitions of beauty and art. 2) The apprehension and qualifications of beauty. 3) The

James Joyce's Alter Ego in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1462 words - 6 pages James Joyce's Alter Ego in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Works Cited Missing In James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Dedalus, a young man growing up, has many of the same traits of the young James Joyce. For example, "On 1 September 1888, at the age of 'half-past-six', Joyce was taken by his parents to be enrolled in the finest Catholic preparatory

Literary devices used in "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man"

887 words - 4 pages Joyce has used the name Daedalus as a literary vehicle to give the reader a sense of deeper understanding about Stephen as a character in "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man ". There is a link between Stephen Dedalus and the Greek mythological figure Daedalus and this becomes apparent to Stephen when he hears his friends say his name in Greek. When Stephen compares himself to the "fabulous artificer" their similar plight reveals itself. The

Essay on Kinship in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1533 words - 6 pages Search for Kinship in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man       At the heart of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man lies Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive young man concerned with discovering his purpose in life. Convinced that his lack of kinship or community with others is a shortcoming that he must correct, Stephen, who is modeled after Joyce, endeavors to fully realize himself by attempting to create a forced

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

978 words - 4 pages Throughout the story A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce we see Stephen's struggle with Catholicism, sin and his destiny. In Stephen's life, which almost mirrors Joyce's, Catholicism is a big part but it fades and in it's place comes art. The title alone tells us that he is an artist not that he is Catholic. It is Joyce's priority to tell us about himself as an artist and how he became to be one, by rejecting Catholicism

Essay on Art in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1578 words - 6 pages Art in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man               Stephen Dedalus' philosophy of art, expressed in his discussion with Lynch in Chapter Five, seems essentially romantic, yet the novel is written in a very realistic mode typical of the twentieth century. This apparent inconsistency may direct us to one way of interpreting this novel. Dedalus' idea of art may be Romantic, but because his world is no longer the world of the

Stephen's Spiritual Development in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1025 words - 4 pages A Tortuous Path: an examination of Stephen's spiritual development in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Joyce divides A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man into five chapters. At the end of each chapter exists somewhat of a revelation, or a climatic moment and realization that Stephen has. These five poetic moments in the novel mirror Stephen's artistic and spiritual development, as he gradually shifts from being brought up in

Imagery and Maturation in "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man"

1559 words - 6 pages James Joyce’s, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, serves as a psychological look into the maturation that occurs within children as they constantly absorb different elements of life. Stephen Dedalus represents what most boy experience while growing up, and his struggles and triumphs serve as an ideal example for the bildungsroman genre. Of the numerous themes within the novel, Joyce’s inclusion of vivid imagery and sensory details provide

Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

3116 words - 12 pages Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man When the soul of a man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets The spirit of Ireland is embodied in young Stephen Dedalus, the central character of James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Like the Dedalus of Greek myth, Stephen

James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

1989 words - 8 pages The need for the protagonist, Stephen Dedalus’ artistic expression is emphasized in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Joyce juxtaposes Stephen Daedalus’ creativity with a commitment to his catholic religion while on his odyssey to find his identity. Which calling will he answer to—artist or priest? The text follows the protagonist through both his positive and negative experiences with priests and his early revelations of

Similar Essays

A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Religion

1037 words - 4 pages A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Religion as Repression Like his protagonist, James Joyce was an Irish Catholic. He was also sent to Clongowes Wood College to board and study as a young boy. In effect the story is in part an autobiography of Joyce's own life up to the age of twenty or so (Kershner 6). In his essay A Portrait as Rebellion Norman Holland states: Because of Portrait's peculiar combination of novel and autobiography, I feel

A "Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man" Analysis

1379 words - 6 pages In "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man", the main character, Stephen Dedalus has a life long desire to find a father figure. Not finding it within his own home he is forced to look out among the other men who play intricate roles in his life. Again and again Stephen is faced with the disappointment of a potential father figure letting him down. It is not until the end of the book, when Stephen looks back over his life, that he has an idea

A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Essay

764 words - 4 pages James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, which takes place in late 19th century Ireland, is a modernist Bildungsroman about Stephen Dedalus, a young man who, while facing the obstacles of his family, religion, and nation, tries to discover his life's purpose. Throughout the novel, Joyce takes the readers through Stephen's labyrinthine life, using techniques such as epiphanies, betrayals, and central images. One of the three

Essay On The Artist As Hero In A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man

1313 words - 5 pages The Artist as Hero in A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man        A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man by James Joyce is a partly autobiographical account of the author's life growing up.  The novel chronicles the process through which the main character, Stephen, struggles against authority and religious doctrine to develop his own philosophies on life.  Stephen is not necessarily rebelling against God and his father as much as he