A Post Racial America Essay

894 words - 4 pages

Every day, race is discussed and criticized in news articles, magazines, television, and various other parts of the media. Although we seem to be past segregation, race is still a polarizing issue. Many people today still assert the idea that certain races are of a lower class or are to be feared, when people are nothing more than products of their own environments. If all minorities were given the same opportunities, these misconceptions and stereotypes would disappear. A post-racial America is not possible because the past of racism will continue to linger throughout generations, people are born as judgemental, and there will always be that one person whose ignorance outweighs all else.
Many people argue that our past racial history is gone and that America is beginning to fulfill the concept of a post-racial America. For instances, there are no longer many major instances of African Americans being treated as a lower class as opposed to other skins. “The election of Obama proved, as nothing else could have, that it [racism] no longer does [exist]” (McWhorter). Barack Obama, our current president, is the first African American to be elected into office. However, people are still judgemental and bigoted towards other races and treat them with very little respect. You often hear Hispanic or Latino Americans being colloquially referred to as Mexicans. You also see people getting stopped and taken aside at airports to participate in supposedly random searches just because they are Muslim. Even the very same African Americans that we have been attempting to treat as equals for so long are still getting treated unfairly. “Only 14 percent of drug users are black, but blacks constitute 37 percent of those arrested for drug crimes...are ten times as likely...to be arrested for drug crimes, despite the fact that whites are more likely to abuse drugs” (Whitehead). Although people believe that we are getting past racism, many are still accusing blacks over crimes they did not commit because of the misconceptions still fostered to this day.
Some believe that since today’s youth has not been exposed to segregation or the degree of racism that was present in the ‘50s and ‘60s, it is only a matter of time before our children and generations to come will realize our dream of having a post-racial America. In terms of racial issues, our current generation of young adults is already more open-minded and accepting than ever. “This latest generation doesn’t harbor some of the ugly prejudices that our parents or we Baby Boomers do” (Reeves). Unfortunately, this does not stop racism from finding its way to them one way or another. We may have taken a substantial leap over the years in deterring racism, but there are still kids today that are brought up believing the same stereotypes and propaganda that our elders are lead to believe. Adults...

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