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A Raisin And The Sun And A House On Mango Street, Comparative Essay.

1263 words - 5 pages

LeeTheme shared by "Raisin in the Sun" and The House on Mango StreetThe play "Raisin in the Sun" was written by Lorraine Hansberry in 1959. Over twenty years later Sandra Cisneros wrote the novella The House on Mango Street. "Raisin in the Sun" is written in a style portraying realistic speech and the reality of the way characters express their feelings. Whereas in The House on Mango Street, the style is very poetic and often uses figurative language to describe the character's feelings. Although "Raisin in the Sun" and The House on Mango Street are two distinct pieces of literature, a theme they both share is that struggles faced as a minority influences the character's dreams.Dreams being influenced by struggles from being a minority can be seen as Ruth from "Raisin in the Sun" talks of Walter Lee's dreams, Ruth says, "Walter Lee say colored people ain't never going to start getting ahead till they start gambling on some different kinds of the things in the world- investments and things"(Hansberry 450). Walter Lee believes that if colored people want to succeed then they must risk and put forth the effort. Most black people were seen as minorities and people of low to middle class. Since the family has been struggling with poverty, Walter Lee feels that he must begin a business to succeed, in order to get out of the low class society. From the stereotype that colored people don't get ahead, he wants to break that stereotype, and prove that colored people could also achieve success.Following from Walter Lee's dreams, Esperanza, the main character from The House on Mango Street, also has dreams that are influenced from the struggles that she faces as a minority. From the episode My Name in the book, Esperanza describes the origin of her name. Her name comes from her great-grandmother who was taken away by her great-grandfather. Her great-grandmother was a woman who "looked out the window her whole life, the way so many women sit there. I have inherited her name, but I don't want to inherit her place by the window" (Cisneros 11). In this case, minority is not specific to race but gender. As a woman, Esperanza's great-grandmother had been taken away and locked in a room since the men thought women were possessions. She let go of her dreams as she stared out the window. Esperanza does not want to be her, the woman sitting by the window. As much as Walter Lee wants to do with prejudice, Esperanza wants to step out of the misconception that women are objects to be owned. To contradict this, she knows that she doesn't want to inherit her great-grandmother's spot.Another part in "Raisin in the sun" is an example of the theme that the two pieces share. It is when Walter Lee calls back Mr. Lindner to ask him for the money in exchange of not moving into the neighborhood. But Walter Lee realizes how shameful this is and instead he says, "And we have decided to move into our house because my father- my father- he earned it for us brick by brick" (Hansberry...

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