A Raisin In The Sound & The American Dream

4398 words - 18 pages

Bergische Universität WuppertalEnglisches SeminarSeminar: American ModernismDozent: Dr. Michael ButterBahar YildirimSunday, March 23, 2014SeminararbeitHemingway`s Iceberg Theory in "Hills Like White Elephants"Im Rahmen des SeminarsAmerican ModernismWS 2013/2014Bahar YildirimMatrikelnummer: 831655Studiengang: Angelistik & Wirtschaftswissenschaften KombiBa 2010Emailadresse: 831655@uni-wuppertal.deTable of Contents1. Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………...32. The Iceberg Theory…………………………………..…………………………………………….....……………33. The Narrative Situation……………………………………..………………………………………………..…..64.Symbolisms and Imagery……………….....…………………………………...…………………….………..…75. Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………..…………………...……...…126. Works Cited……………………………………………………………………..…………………………………...13Introduction"If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one-eight of it being above water. A writer who omits things because he does not know them only makes hollow places in his writing" (Oliver 322).Ernest Hemingway is noted as one of the greatest American writers in literature with his unique writing style. His famous iceberg theory, also known as the theory of omission" had a great influence on many writers of the 20th...

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