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An Analysis Of George Orwell And 1984

2578 words - 10 pages

Through much of his life, Eric Arthur Blair (pen name George Orwell) sought to vilify the mental and emotional oppression he faced early on and breathe life into the specific ramifications entailed within Socialism as a result of the era in which he grew up in. The culminating result of these forces is evident in his last piece of work, 1984, where the very fabric of Socialism had become distorted in favor of a completely dystopian society in which human history is being rewritten every day and simple emotion and thought has all but been eradicated. Blair solidifies his overall theme of total tyrannical control and oppression in 1984 through the period of pertinent history he endured as well as his own personal experiences.
According to Edward Quinn of Bloom’s Literature, as the son of a British colonial civil servant father and a housewife as his mother, Eric Arthur Blair grew up wanting to be more than his circumstances deemed possible. He was born in June 25, 1903 in present-day northeastern India, and soon thereafter, his family relocated to England due to a widespread plague in India. From very early on had had fragile health but a sharp mind, which rendered journal entries as early as the age of 19 months and several poems to his mother. His education started out in a convent school run by French nuns, and later he was accepted into a preparatory school named St. Cyprian in Eastbourne, England. Here he received frequent punishment for his bed-wetting and was publicly chastised, which later resulted in a deprecating recollection of his time spent at the school in Such, Such Were the Joys. His avid disapproval of St. Cyprian’s was overshadowed by his interactions with his neighbors, the Buddicoms – specifically the oldest girl, Jacintha. Later on at the apex of their courtship in their late teens, Jacintha accused Blair of attempting to rape her, which he downplayed as ‘innocent pouncing’. He then moved onto a secondary prep school, Eton, where much of his zeal for formal education had faded away, and he found himself put off by the perpetual “rat race up the social ladder”. Having graduated Eton at the age of 18 but deciding not to continue onto University, he went to stay with his family at their new home in Southwold, England and began to look for work as a young adult (Quinn).
The oppression he felt from his earliest experiences are just one half of the driving force for his many novels, the most biographically and historically relevant being 1984, published within a year before his death. His experiences in school, although criticized for being exaggerated by fellow classmates, are primarily what sets the tone for his beliefs in adulthood and further sets the tone for his final piece of work. It is apparent, as he went through his teenage years especially that he took a stark, indifferent stance on his education or becoming ‘run of the mill’ and leading a monotonous life like his father had. He drew many parallels between life...

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