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A Short Comparision Of Nature And Humans And The Man In Jack Londons "To Build A Fire".

821 words - 3 pages

SHORT FICTION ESSAYIn Jack London's To Build a Fire the antagonist is said to be Nature and the protagonists is said to be the man; other words nature is conflicting impulses within the protagonist. Or the man is trying to survive nature's natural forces against him which are seventy-five below zero temperatures.After his accident of falling into the river and getting his legs wet he decided to make a fire, for him to warm up and dry off. He had not believe what an old man had warned him about going out alone after fifty-below " a man should travel with a partner" he remember the man saying. But he was hard headed and thought that he could still make it. After he made the fire he realized he had forgotten to make it out in the open where snow would have not fallen off of trees onto it. But do to his miscalculations, which is just human to do, the fire failed to stay lit and went out due to the snow, which fell from the tree. He then once more remembered what the old man had said about not traveling alone but he thought that he would be fine; trying to ignore these thoughts, he thought to himself that this time he would build the fire out in the open. At that time though he did not realize that he was slowing freezing to death. But he tried to ignore those thoughts, and tried to concentrate on collecting sticks, but while getting more nervous by the minutes. He tried not to think about his body freezing but the thought just kept popping up into his mind, making him clumsy in collecting the right types of sticks. When he then went to start the fire he took his mittens off and soon realized that his hands where so frozen that he could not then light a match in order to start a fire. After attempting for a while he manage to start a small inadequate fire, which quickly extinguished. Leaving him now with no fire and a freezing body. He then began to panic he was freezing he was out of matches and he would surely freeze to death if he did not do something immediately. He tried to keep the voice in his head from reminding him that he was going to...

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