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A Stylistic Study Of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2375 words - 10 pages

Abstract: The Great Gatsby, one of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpieces, is viewed as the first step thatAmerican fiction has taken since Henry James. The paper attempts to study and unveil its writing skills and fivemajor elements of this great novel from a stylistic perspective for better understanding and appreciation of itsconsummate artistry.Key words: writing skills; stylistic elements; artistry1. IntroductionF. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) was one of the great writers in American literature. Living most of thepost-war boom years, when the American society was viewed as the hope of the new world overloaded with thrillsand enthusiasm, he foresaw its potential doom and failure which was revealed in his series of renowned works,such as, The Great Gatsby, This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, Tales of the Jazz Age, The Vegetable,and Tender is the Night. Among them, T. S. Eliot commented on The Great Gatsby as a critical success andviewed it as "the first step that American fiction has taken since Henry James". Undoubtedly, Fitzgerald became aspokesman who reflected the crucial period in the twenties history of America, and The Great Gatsby is rankedamong the most enduring of world literature. Therefore, this paper is designed to explore the relevant stylisticelements of this novel for better understanding of this talented writer's impeccable craftsmanship.2. Narrative TechniqueAll novels are made up of printed words in a literal sense, but a novel may be revealed to the reader as if itwere spoken rather than written, especially, with the help of a definite narrator.Reading a novel can be interpreted as being told by the novel in a sense. We are told what happens in thenovel line by line, page by page. Sometimes, the printed words speak for themselves, that is, without a definiteteller, the preplanned information is revealed to the reader, and the author can have the story told by a personifiednarrator, a teller who has detailed personal data and whose meditation and sights are thrusted at the reader. Justlike Nick Caraway, the narrator of this book, who has his name and detailed personal information. Here,Fitzgerald chooses Nick Carraway as a dramatic narrator through whose consciousness everything is combined tobe an organic unity of the work. Nick, generally speaking, is considered as a cool-minded, reliable narrator,because he pursuits his father's advice on tolerance and reasonable judgment and he seldom jumps to a harshconclusion. Furthermore, Nick ensures his validity because he exclusively has access to contact with three kindsof people who represent different social positions and hold varied life creeds.To dwell it on, it is necessary to study some basic elements like tense, tone, and mood. According to StudyingZHAO Jing(1972- ), female, lecturer of Basic Courses Department, Shandong University of Science and Technology; researchfields: literary studies, applied linguistics. A Stylistic Study of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great...

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