A Summary, Analysis And Evaluation Of "A Rose For Emily" By William Faulkner And Comparison Between "A Rose For Emily" And "Barn Burning" By William Faulkner

721 words - 3 pages

"A Rose for Emily""A Rose for Emily" is a tragic story about a woman named Emily Grierson who, for all her life has been controlled by her father. Once her father dies, Emily does not know, nor understand how to live her own life. At first she denies that her father dies; then after 3 days, with much pressuring from the locals and the doctors, she admits her fathers death and lets the townspeople bury him. Much of the town is wondering what to expect to happen to Emily. Emily becomes a recluse and sends her manservant, Tobe, who has served the family for generations, out to the market to do the shopping for her. One day, she meets a Yankee day laborer named Homer Barron. Homer and Emily begin seeing each other and eventually seem to get serious about their relationship. Emily begins to fall in love with Homer, but Homer does not have the same feelings for Emily. One day, Homer disappears and is never seen nor heard from again. Ten years pass and Emily dies. The townspeople were curious and went to her home to see where she had lived her life. Upon their arrival they find a corpse lying on a bed in a mysterious locked room upstairs. On the bed, next to the corpse there was a "long strand of iron-gray hair" (36).In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner tells a story about a young woman who is overly influenced and controlled by her father. Her father has made all the decisions for her and he choose who she could and could not be courted by. After her father dies, it takes Emily three days to finally allow the townspeople to give her father a proper burial, because of her denial that her father has indeed, died. Emily has relied so heavy on her father for all of her life, she does not know what to do, or how to live. After her father's death, Emily stays in her house where she feels safe, and does not go out into the outside world, regardless of what has happened and changed. As everything changed in the outside world, Emily still lives with the...

Find Another Essay On A summary, analysis and evaluation of "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner and comparison between "A Rose for Emily" and "Barn Burning" by William Faulkner

A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner

1318 words - 5 pages change yet is not considered a traditional southern woman. The story of Emily Grierson is a typical southern gothic tale that incorporates the demented and queer as well as a woman put on display, detailing her life through the judgmental and ever present eye of her community. Works Cited Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” Collected Stories of William Faulkner. New York: Vintage Books, 1977. Print. Donaldson, Susan V. "Making a Spectacle: Welty, Faulkner, and Southern Gothic." The Mississippi Quarterly 50.4 (1997): 567-84. ProQuest. Web. 27 January 2014.

A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner

1804 words - 7 pages 2011 Everybody Would Hand a Rose In his short story, “A Rose for Emily” William Faulkner gives us a picture of female identity from a male point of view, showing compassion and forgiveness for his central character. Intriguingly, the writer uses the word “rose” in the title even though a rose does not exist in any part of his story; it has highly symbolic implications. Usually, the rose

"A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner.

1087 words - 4 pages The Past Is the Present After World War One, there were many changes occurring in the world. Man's inherent need to follow tradition was now being challenged by a continually changing, modern world. The past and the present often conflicted. William Faulkner, a southern born writer, based much of his novels and short stories on this conflict. He aptly reflects the turmoil of the past and the present in, " A Rose for Emily". The conflict between

"A Rose For Emily" by William Faulkner.

1020 words - 4 pages A Rose or A Thorn?In the story "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner, readers get an idea of a different time and place. He also portrays to us this old woman who has become a thorn in the townships side. Faulkner describes Emily as "a tradition, duty, and a care; sort of hereditary obligation upon the town" (246), but was this really just an old women unwilling to accept change?He puts you in the scenes by giving great details of her house

"A rose for Emily" by William Faulkner

1301 words - 5 pages In "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner, we see how past events effect the main character Miss Emily, especially her mental state. She seems to live in a sort of fantasy world where death has no real meaning. Miss Emily refuses to accept or even recognize, the death of her father or that of Colonel Satoris. She does not want to acknowledge the fact that the world around her was changing therefore Miss Emily surrounds herself with death. What

A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner

1598 words - 6 pages Running Head: A Rose for Emily by William FaulknerA Rose for Emily by William FaulknerA Rose for Emily by William FaulknerPart I. General Writing and AnalysisWilliam Faulkner is a writer of "A Rose for Emily". On September 25, 1897, he was born in New Albany, Mississippi. His grandfather was a writer, and he benefit from poetry at a very initial age. He was lived near the University of Mississippi at Oxford, where he ultimately studied Spanish

A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner

1094 words - 4 pages Insanity in a Rose for Emily William Faulkner was an American writer from Oxford, Mississippi, who was praised for his novels and short stories, many whom take place in Yoknapatawpha County, fictitious setting based on where he spent most of his childhood, Lafayette County. Faulkner, regarded as one of the most vital writers of the Southern literature of the United States, was somewhat unheard of until being given the Nobel Prize in Literature

A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner

1588 words - 6 pages In the story “ A Rose for Emily”, by William Faulkner the narrator introduces the reader to Emily Grierson, a sheltered southern woman who while alive struggled immensely with her sanity and the evolving world around her. Emily's father, a very prestigious man is the cause of Emily's senseless behavior. He kept her secluded from the rest of the town “We remembered all the young men her father had driven away...” (Page 3.) If Emily had been

A Rose For Emily, by William Faulkner

1136 words - 5 pages Both of the stories that will be compared in this paper, William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, are very demented novels that contain central premises very estranged to most readers. Though Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" is a short story, the depth and description contained inside its brief text give it the ability to be compared to a novel such as Frankenstein; primarily it's ability to explain the factors

"A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner.

1091 words - 4 pages In William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily," we see how past events affect the life of the main character Miss Emily, especially her inability to accept change. Throughout the story Miss Emily goes to extreme measures to protect her social status. Miss Emily lives in the past to shield herself from a future that holds no promises and no guarantees. William Faulkner illustrates Miss Emily's inability to accept change through the physical, social and

A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner

1108 words - 4 pages and created imageries people associate with both, and will not go away overnight or in a century, possibly not even in a millennium. These typical obligations have become preserved by literature throughout history. One such narrative is “A Rose for Emily”, written by William Faulkner in 1930. There are remarks that have meanings beyond being merely a word with a definition. These symbols and keywords based on gender roles are throughout the story

Similar Essays

Symbolism In "A Rose For Emily" And "Barn Burning" By William Faulkner

1046 words - 4 pages In his many works of fiction, William Faulkner explores the lives of characters who live in the closed society of the American South, a society rooted in traditional values. In the short stories "Barn Burning" and "A Rose for Emily," Faulkner explores what happens when individuals lose their connection to this society and its values. Both Abner Snopes, a rebellious sharecropper, and Emily Grierson, an unmarried woman from a prominent family, are

Analysis And Summary Of "A Rose For Emily" By William Faulkner

1094 words - 4 pages experiencing between the old south (past) and the new south (present). At the end of the story, it is shown what William Faulkner meant by a rose, in his title "A Rose for Emily". The "rose" is all of her dust-covered treasures, especially those of her wedding that she wanted; "…this room decked and furnished as for a bridal:upon the valance curtains of faded rose color, upon the rose-shaded lights, upon the delicate array of crystal and

A Rose For Emily By: William Faulkner

1738 words - 7 pages An Analysis of"A Rose for Emily"William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" is a very complex story. This short story was Faulkner's "first sale of a short story to a national magazine: Forum" (Skei, 84). Faulkner, born in Mississippi, "began to construct his fictional chronicle of Yoknapatawpha County, (which is) often based directly on the history of his own Lafayette County" (Inge, 136). This is the setting of "A Rose for Emily." Also, Faulkner

A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner

1275 words - 5 pages .Literature, Interpretation (1979): 62-64 & 311-361. JSTOR. Web. 28 Feb. 2014. Nebeker, Helen. "Emily's Rose of Love: Thematic Implications of Pointf View in Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"." Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association 24 (1970): 3-13. JSTOR. Web. 28 Feb. 2014. Scherting, Jack. "Emily Grierson's Oedipus Complex: Motif, Motive and Meaning in Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily'." Studies in Short Fiction 17.4 (1980): 397-405. Print. Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” Literature Reading, Reacting, Writing. Ed. Lautie G.Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandel. Compact 8th Ed. Boston: Wadsworth, 2013. 220-226. Print.