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A Violation Of Rights School Uniforms Essay

927 words - 4 pages

I believe all people have the right to express themselves. However, with rights come responsibility, a concept most people ignore. Having a "right" is to be free to express one's self. Consequentially, having a "responsibility" is doing it constructively, in such a way as to not violate policies, laws, and others' rights. There is a definite difference between a dress code and a school uniform. I support enforcing a school dress code, but is implementing a school uniform necessary? No matter how students dress, they will still pass judgments on their peers, uniforms do not necessarily save money, and children are forced to conform to the same standards. While in school, teachers have a responsibility to teach and students have the responsibility to learn. Both have the right to exist in their environment without harassment and the right to express their individuality. Some people have found some expressions crude, obnoxious, and distracting. To combat the problem, the idea of mandating school uniforms was introduced. This notion of making everyone appear "uniformed" in order to cut down on violence and negativity in school, is absolutely mislaid.
School was designed to equally teach all children not only book knowledge but also offer practice in cooperation with others on a social scale. The home was designed to teach children right from wrong, to respect and obey authority, and how to socially function properly with others. Sadly, the parents have left it on the hands of the teachers and administration to raise their children. Parents in modern terms have become lazy and have sent their children off to be raised by someone else, while they lead their own lives, not fulfilling their duties as a fulltime parent. They do so with the best of intentions, but it has lead to many problems. It is not the school's responsibility to teach neither morals, principles, nor the entirety of social interaction. This is a responsibility of the home and parents. Proper behavior should be taught at home and re-enforced in school. If the rules are violated, proper punishment should follow. A violation at home should result in a "home based" punishment. A violation at school should result in a "school based" punishment and a "home punishment," each requiring appropriate punishment for the violation.
Kids have the right to express themselves in a non-violent way. Many times children express themselves by wearing shirts of different rock bands, different brands of jeans, Polo tennis sweaters, or even dyed hair and body piercings. Just because a certain person or group does not like one or any of those things does not give them the right to dictate what someone should wear. Uniforms are supposed to stop kids from passing judgment...

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