A Woman's Desire In "The Storm" By Kate Chopin

966 words - 4 pages

Every storm creeps upon us, hits a high point, and then fades away into nothing. In "The Storm," the author Kate Chopin describes the way that a thunderstorm is like the good and bad times in a person's life. She uses the beginning of the storm to describe the feelings, the climax of the storm to describe the temptations, and thunder and lightning of the storm to describe the deception of a young housewife and mother in the late 1800's. In the beginning like a storm, Calixta is quiet, calm, and unthreatening to man. But as her feelings began to develop, she becomes stimulated and intense; a force driven by nature, as hopeless at controlling her own desires as a storm is at controlling the damage it leaves in it's way. "Bobinôt who accustomed to converse on terms of perfect equality with his little son, called the child's attention to certain somber clouds that were rolling with sinister intention from the west, accompanied by a sullen, threatening roar" (Chopin 112). This describes the similarities between Calixta and Bobinôt's relationship and the thunderstorm. There doesn't seem to be a lot of romance and passion between Calixta and Bobinôt. She loves her husband but something is missing between them. When Calixta sees Alcee Laballière after many years her past catches up with her. The feelings that she had for him start to make her act like a schoolgirl again.At this point in the story Calixta is remembering the passionate times that her and Alcee had at one time. As the storm is progressing and getting stronger so are the temptations between Calixta and Alcee. "As she glanced up at him the fear in her liquid blue eyes had given place to a desire. He looked down into her eyes and there was nothing for him to do but to gather her lips in a kiss. It reminded him of Assumption"(114). "Oh! she remembered; for in Assumption he had kissed her and kissed and kissed her; until his senses would well nigh fail, and to save her he would resort to a desperate flight." "The generous abundance of her passion, without guile or trickery, was like a white fame which penetrated and found response in depths of his own sensuous nature that had never yet been reached" (115). Not only was it a hot and steamy summer but it was getting hot and steamy inside Calixta and Bobinôt 's house. The feelings between Calixta and Alcee were becoming stronger then they ever thought of: "When he touched her breasts they gave...

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