This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Abolition Of The Death Penalty Essay

1039 words - 4 pages

The Abolishment of the Death Penalty
As Americans we live in a modern republic under a government constructed to secure the rights of the people. Today’s government and judicial systems were forged by our founding fathers as they fought to establish a government free from tyranny and brutality and thereby forming a constitution based on civil liberties. Our country has grown and matured through the centuries and in effect has made changes and alterations as innovations and advancements have deemed necessary. One area where we seem to have evolved at a slower rate is in the archaic and often inhumane judicial laws of the death penalty. The death penalty, a law which strips the civil liberties and violates the human rights of the accused offender, needs to be abolished. If as a nation we are to uphold our integrity it is imperative that the United States embrace the worldwide movement toward the complete abolition of the inhumane act of capital punishment.
Intense controversy over the legality of the death penalty in the United States has always been multi-faceted and emotionally charged. Constitutional lawyers insist the founding fathers made provision for the death penalty in the 5th amendment which guarantees “due process of law before a person can be deprived of life, liberty or property”, while ignoring the 8th amendment which bars cruel and unusual punishments (Singh, 2003). There is no constitutional amendment that gives state or federal governments the authority to proclaim death as a penalty. This is an assumption based on the methods of punishment used in the era of the first colonies. The archaic “eye for an eye”, “Annie get your gun” justice has regressed into a self-justifying realm of indecision where it is easier continue in conventional tradition. We need to demand the legal system be held accountable to constitutional laws as written not as interpreted based on history. Death by hanging, firing squads, electrocution, the gas chamber and death by lethal injection are all options still available to those on death row. Each one in progression a little more civilized then the one before it, or so society attempts to convince themselves. The courts, as well as society, need to stop accepting and allowing these gruesome acts of purposely killing another human in the name of justice.
In recent centuries the majority of American citizens supported the death penalty believing it served both as a deterrent and as an appropriate response to particularly heinous crimes. Unquestionably, there are heinous acts of crime being committed. Yes, these crimes need to be addressed, victims and their families need validation and offenders needed to be prosecuted, punished and kept from harming others. Yet, in our imperfect legal system and often overzealous prosecution mistakes are inevitable. Seemingly conclusive circumstantial evidence, coerced confessions, emotionally biased witness testimonies, inadequate legal representation and community...

Find Another Essay On Abolition of The Death Penalty

Death Penalty in Canada - Abolition Movement's Success

3002 words - 13 pages the death penalty. This was a huge obstacle for abolitionists, as public favour was very much against them. Thus, outside events provided opposition to the abolitionist movement and made it very difficult to forward their agenda. As a movement, the abolitionists had early origins and compelling opinions. In 1914, Richard Bickerdike was the first man to propose the abolition of the death penalty. His critiques of the death penalty were that

Capital Punishment, specifically, the practice of State administered death as a penalty for any crime requires abolition

1108 words - 4 pages absent execution. Abolition of capital punishment is the only praiseworthy option.[D] capital punishment• adjective 1 (of an offense or charge) liable to the death penalty.• noun the legally authorized killing of someone as punishment for a crime.Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current EnglishThird edition revisedRevised EditionOxford Dictionaries978-0-19-953296-4 | Hardback | 19 June 2008[D1] retribution - n. a justly deserved

The Death Penalty - Overview of the death penalty including history

589 words - 2 pages is mandated by the U.N. Commission for Human Rights to address instances of executions that violate international standards regarding human rights and the right to life. Amnesty International is a well-known international human rights organization based in London and issues annual reports on human rights issues throughout the world. It advocates for the abolition of the death penalty, and has an ongoing anti-death penalty campaign.

Cost of the Death Penalty

1185 words - 5 pages Costs and Consequences of the Death Penalty, written by Mark Costanzo, neatly lists reasons for opposition, and abolishment of, the death penalty. Costanzo provides a review of the history of the death penalty, a review of how the death penalty process is working today, questions on whether or not if the death penalty is inhumane and cheaper than life imprisonment. He also questions if the death penalty is fairly applied and the impact, if

Benefits of the Death Penalty

1554 words - 6 pages Have you ever thought about if the person next to you is a killer or a rapist? If he is, what would you want from the government if he had killed someone you know? He should receive the death penalty! Murderers and rapists should be punished for the crimes they have committed and should pay the price for their wrongdoing. Having the death penalty in our society is humane; it helps the overcrowding problem and gives relief to the families of

Constitutionality of the Death Penalty

1792 words - 8 pages could receive life in prison when another person committing an equal offence might receive capital punishment? Is it right for the United States to operate a system such as capital punishment? Does that follow the guidelines set out by our constitution or does it contradict? What would the forefathers of this nation say about the death penalty? Is the death penalty a form of cruel and unusual punishment? America has established themselves as somewhat

Arguments of the death penalty

567 words - 2 pages Is death the justification of a murder or are we merely subduing ourselves by performing the same heinous act? This argument had been debated for many decades and although some feel that death is the answer to a murder, there are others that find it completely barbaric. Through a careful analysis between Edward Koch's "Death and Justice" and David Bruck's "The Death Penalty", I believe Koch had the better argument in claiming that death is the

Abolishment of the Death Penalty

2800 words - 12 pages The death penalty was reinstated in this nation on January 17, 1977 after a ten year ban following the Furman v. Georgia case. Following this act, torture has turned into one of the biggest controversies in the United States. Currently, there are seventeen states that do not enforce the death penalty while others are continuing to debate legislation on whether or not to make the death penalty illegal. Law makers who advocate the

Flaws of the Death Penalty

973 words - 4 pages Flaws of the Death Penalty Capital Punishment has been part of the criminal justice system since as far back as 1700 B.C. However, in recent times opponents have shown the death penalty to be racist, barbaric, and in violation with the United States Constitution as "...cruel and unusual punishment." In this country, although laws governing the application of the death penalty have undergone many changes since biblical times, the punishment

Immorality of the Death Penalty

728 words - 3 pages 1. Introduction A. Attention Getter: Thou shall not kill, only one of the ten commandments that some individuals unfortunately can not seem to uphold. What would the world look like if we did not have an “eye for an eye” mentality? The debate about whether or not capital punishment is ethical or immoral is significant because our country is spending unnecessary amounts on death penalty executions, in which citizens do not know enough about the

Support of the Death Penalty

705 words - 3 pages I do support the death penalty and I do not consider it cruel or unusual treatment. The Constitution itself indicates that the death penalty can be used. Amendment V of the Constitution states that “…no person shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law….” (U.S. Const., amend V). In other words, once a person has gone through the due process of law, his life can be taken if he is found guilty. There is a

Similar Essays

The Case For The Abolition Of The Death Penalty

681 words - 3 pages Also known as, Capital Punishment, the death penalty is the most severe form of corporal punishment, as it requires law enforcement to kill the offender. Forms of the death penalty include hanging, gassing, firing squad, electrocution, and lethal injection. This paper will look at the death penalty as it applies to cost, deterrence, and the innocence of the accused. It will discuss these issues as it applies to the overall benefit of abolishing

Arguement For The Abolition Of The Death Penalty

731 words - 3 pages The Supreme Court effectively decided to suspend the death penalty in June 1972 through 1976. After 4 years of suspending the death penalty across the country, the court reinstalled the penalty to the states. The death penalty includes 34 states that proceeded to statute the new death penalty. The states such as Florida, Georgia, and Texas were essential in reinstating the death penalty. The Eighth Amendment and many states wished to reinstate

Arguement For The Abolition Of The Death Penalty

744 words - 3 pages The death penalty in the United States has been a constant topic for controversy. The death penalty throughout history has been thought to be a deterrent to crime and illegal activities such as homicide, rape, and treason. But should we put capital punishment to the death? Today in modern societies, supporters of the death penalty have withered in number a lot and critics consider it inhumane and barbaric but this attitude is unrealistic and

Death Penalty Abolition Movement Essay

1518 words - 7 pages their guilt. Our death penalty system is riddled with problems, and it results in too many mistakes. The execution of even one innocent person is too many.” Now the question that rises is how can judges distinguish the difference between innocent and guilty people? There was a human rights article written by Ross, Michael who explained specific terms for it. Ross Illustrates that the U.S Judicial system relies on a burden of proof called “beyond