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Abortion In The United States Essay

1937 words - 8 pages

What is abortion? According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “Abortion: the premature expulsion of a [foetus] from the womb; an operation to cause this.” Abortion has been a controversial topic for many years. Some people favor adoption and some are against it. “In 2008 an estimated 1.21 million abortions were performed in the Unites States.”(Jones, and Kooistra). Many opinions collaborate in abortions rights or abortion legislation. “In 2008, 84,610 women obtained abortions in Texas, producing a rate of 16.5 abortions per 1,000 women of reproductive age. Some of these women were from other states, and some Texas residents had abortions in other states, so this rate may not reflect the abortion rate of state residents. The rate decreased 4% since 2005, when it was 17.3 abortions per 1,000 women 15-44. Abortions in Texas represent 7% of all abortions in the United States.”(Jones, Zolna, Henshaw, and Finer). Some argues that favors abortion focus in the mother’s rights to choose what to do in her body, and opponents of abortion focus on the fetus right to life without the discomfort of the mother. In my opinion, abortion should be prohibiting as it increase every day. Abortions are performed legal as well as illegal in which is a criminal action against the laws of the United States, also there are physiological, emotional, and physical consequences in women who perform an abortion, and mainly because by murdering the fetus it denies the right of life to a child.
According to Texas Statues Abortion enacted in 1857, Article 1191, describes how a women will be punish to “not less than two nor more than five years” in jail if with her consent an abortion is performed. (Druker). Before 1973, abortion was prohibited and consider criminal in the penal code. “An estimated 750,000 illegal abortions were performed in the United States.” (Druker). It was on the year of 1973 were Roe vs. Wade, a decision made by the Supreme Court of the United States were women history change. It authorized women to perform an abortion legally in the early stages of pregnancy. “The landmark Supreme Court ruling on abortion was a complete overhaul of abortion laws in effect in a number of states, which allowed abortion only to save the life of the mother. A few of the states had previously granted permission for an abortion if the pregnancy was a result of rape or incest, but elective abortion was not permitted.” (Druker). Some people argue that the law were abusing power and did not let women to do as pleased with their bodies. “For more than thirty years the courts have ruled that mentally competent pregnant women can be forced to undergo medical treatments believed necessary to preserved fetal health and life.” (Schroedel) Even though abortion was legalized to prevent unsanitary conditions and death in women, illegal abortion still occurs, like teenagers to perform an abortion without the consent of the parents. “Although teenagers may trust their parents, they had...

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