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Absence Of Heroes And Villains In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

1316 words - 5 pages

Absence of Heroes and Villains in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
Frankenstein is a gothic novel which was published in the 19th
century, and was written by Mary Shelley. In the 19th century the most
popular types of novels were horror. This novel was an early example
of a thriller. One of the main reasons why Mary Shelley wrote a book
about science, horror and suffering was because she knew that people
in the 19th century were interested in all of these aspects. The novel
also deals with issues of good vs evil, and through this the author
creates a sense of horror in the readers mind.

Heroes are those people who do something unexpected, so the creature
could be a hero as he lived and grew up by himself. A villain is
someone who does something for the wrong reasons and enjoys causing
havoc, so the creature can be seen as a villain as he kills many
people. A victim is someone who is someone being targeted by a villain
and goes through a lot of suffering because of it, in this novel all
of the characters can be seen as victims in different ways.

Frankenstein can be seen as a scientific hero by the fact that he
created life by no more than the means of electricity; he gives a
lifeless creature his first breath. He could also be seen as a hero as
he has accomplished something that some people could only dream of but
not accomplish. Another person that could be seen as a hero is Walton.
Walton shows us how much of a risk he is willing to take for his
ambition and courage; he puts his own life and his crew's life in
danger for his ambition and courage to accomplish his goal. He thought
that he was the victim for going away and leaving his sister Margaret.
As soon as Walton hears about that Victor Frankenstein has abandoned
the creature, he realises that the creature is the victim, also Walton
realises that going leaving his sister was a bad idea, making him feel
like a villain in the end.

The most obvious victims are those people who are killed by the
creature, however the only victims are not those killed by the
creature, but could be the creature itself. At first the monster is
seen as evil who only knows how to kill people and destroy innocent
lives, as the novel goes on we the reader begin to see a different
perception of the creature. "I, the miserable and the abandoned, am an
abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and trampled on". From
Walton's final letter to his sister, he recounts the words that the
creature speaks o him over Victor Frankenstein's dead body. This
outburst of self-pity as the creature questions the inequality of how
he has been treated, giving Walton and the reader a glimpse into the
suffering that has caused his evil acts. This also shows that the
creature is an unwanted life, a creation abandoned...

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