This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Act One Scene 3 Of William Shakespeare's Othello

1591 words - 6 pages

Act One Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's Othello

Referring to the passage in page 155, I have analysed several points
in conjunction to background knowledge, in attempt to answer the task
set above. Initially, I feel that it is very important to relate to
the character of Iago. As a character, Iago has the potential to be a
man of extreme power but he does not have the tool that we refer to as
money. All that he has is ambition; and he remains malcontent until he
attains his aspirations. He pretends to be doing tasks but refrains
from them, showing us a strong sense of corruption. The most important
role that he plays is that of an extreme racist, words like "black
ram", "moor", "thick-lipped", "devil", "animal". These are cheap
weapons. He has to use race as an excuse as he knows that Othello is
greater than him in all aspects. The passage that I am studying in Act
1 Scene 3, refers to his characteristics. Iago's relationships are
dysfunctional, he does not care about what he says; nor does he care
about anyone else's feelings. Iago has many reasons for.

Iago has many reasons for acting the way he does, his reasons may not
be right or logical but he believes in them so strongly that he is
willing to oppose people in the process of completing them. His entire
motives stem from one thing and that is jealousy. All of his motives
are due to this single feeling. His revenge comes from wanting to
avenge the people he is jealous of. In his quest for revenge he uses
Roderigo for money and the strangest reason of all, he seems to enjoy
what he is doing, shows his cunningness as he is able to use
corruption as a form of leisure.

In this paragraph, Iago's envy and rage against Othello is evident.
Also, there are references to his plan as well as his obsession with
money, which invites Roderigo into the story. The 28 year old man,
"four times seven years…", is not self critical. Iago has no
restrictions on himself, backed up by "I never found a man that knew
how to love himself…". The beginning of his speech, concentrates on
the philosophical aspects of life, and that we are what we choose to
be. Furthermore, we can understand from line 330 that Iago does not
believe in love. "But we have reason to cool our raging motions, our
carnal stings, our unbitted…". This shows the contrast between him and
Othello. Iago becomes very jealous of Othello because of his position
in the Venetian Army. Iago feels that black men cannot rise above him
because they are black. Iago frequently refers to Othello as the
"Moor" and the "Black Ram", with these statements Iago is implying
that Othello is worse than white people and because of his race he
should not hold the position he does in the army. Out of this racism
also extends the jealousy of Othello's wife, Desdemona. He is sexually
attracted to...

Find Another Essay On Act One Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's Othello

Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

1226 words - 5 pages Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Before act 3 scene 5 happens many important events take place, these include Romeo and Juliet secretly getting married, then Romeo killing Tybolt as revenge for Mercutio's death. As a result of this Romeo is going to be banished while this is happening Juliet's father is arranging for her to marry Paris. At the beginning of the scene Romeo and Juliet wake up and

Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

1301 words - 5 pages Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet In act 3 scene 1 there are two major fights which both result in deaths, the first fight is between Tybalt and Mercutio, Romeo tries helping Mercutio by standing in-between Tybalt and Mercutio but Mercutio gets hurt under Romeos arm, this fight results in the death of Mercutio. Romeo then is very angry and upset with Tybalt for killing

Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

1860 words - 7 pages Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet "And you be mine, I'll give you to my friend; And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, for by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee…" What do you think of the way Lord Capulet behaves in Act 3 Scene 5 and what do the audience learn about his character? Lord Capulet's behaviour is seen as particularly important as it changes dramatically

Act 3 Scene 4 of William Shakespeare's Hamlet

1780 words - 7 pages Act 3 Scene 4 of William Shakespeare's Hamlet It is tempting to condemn Gertrude as evil, but it is probably more sensible to consider her as weak and inconstant. But when have tragedy plays ever been sensible? Like many of Shakespeare's women it is argued that their characters are somewhat "sketched in" rather than drawn in with detail like for example, Hamlet's. The way Shakespeare has "sketched in" Gertrude's

Act 3, Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

2611 words - 10 pages Act 3, Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 1 is very important because it lays the ground for the rest of the play. It signals a turning point and is also central to the play’s structure as well as to the drama. The first half of the play is focused on love and romance whereas the second will concentrate on more tragic and calamitous drama. The scene represents a climax to suspense built

Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

1565 words - 6 pages Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet A turning point in the play Romeo and Juliet is in act 3 seen 1 when Romeo kills Tybalt, because Mercutio's and Tybalt's death influence the future events in the play, there is a change in Romeo's fortune, behaviour which leads to tragedy. Shakespeare introduces fear and tension that continues till the end of the play and increases the pace of the play and the

Act 3, Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

3068 words - 12 pages Act 3, Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 5 greatly changes Juliet's character and situation. Show how the events of the scene change Juliet from the girl who insists: "It was the nightingale and not the lark," to someone who can calmly say "If all else fail, myself have power to die." At the beginning of this scene, we see Juliet as a calm girl very much in love with Romeo. She cannot bear

Act 3 Scene I of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

3355 words - 13 pages Act 3 Scene I of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Before Act 3 scene i we know that there are two feuding families, the Capulets and the Montagues. The audience has been told at the start that to resolve this dispute their children, two innocent lovers, must die. The Prince had explicitly told the family that if there is another brawl their ‘lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace’. Romeo a Montague went

Act Three Scene One of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

2848 words - 11 pages Act Three Scene One of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Italians normally take a nap after lunch during the heat of the day. In the height of summer the heat is supposed to create madness. Shakespeare may have moved the action from spring to summer for just this reason. There are many themes in this play especially in this scene * Hastiness- Romeo is hasty to fall in and out of love. The two are too

Act III, scene iii of Shakespeare's Othello

1959 words - 8 pages In this piece of course work I was told to look in depth at scene III of the play 'Othello'. I will begin by telling you the outline of the scene, then a closer look in to the scene.Desdemona decides that she wants to advocate for Cassio. She tells Emilia so, and that she believes Cassio is a good person, and has been wronged in this case; she pledges to do everything she can to persuade her husband to take Cassio back. Cassio speaks with her

The Role of Act 3 Scene 1 and Act 3 Scene 5 in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

4863 words - 19 pages The Role of Act 3 Scene 1 and Act 3 Scene 5 in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet There are several incidents that take place during the course of the play that prepare us, the audience, for the plays tragic end. Shakespeare manages to use several devices to prepare us for the plays tragic end. He uses a prologue at the beginning to give us a brief idea about the play. Devices such as omens, premonitions, soliloquies

Similar Essays

Act One Scene One Of William Shakespeare's Othello

1765 words - 7 pages Act One Scene One of William Shakespeare's Othello The opening scene of Act One Scene One starts off with a dispute between Iago and Roderigo at night in Venice Italy. The darkness and conflicts in the first scene illustrates an ominous atmosphere for the rest of

Act Two Scene 3 Of William Shakespeare's Othello

5105 words - 20 pages Act Two Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's Othello 'Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.' Othello ======= Act 2, Scene 3 Case Study: Cognitive and Behavioural Psychotherapy for Distressing Thoughts in Work Introduction The Community

The Significance Of Act 3 Scene 3 Of William Shakespeare's Othello

2506 words - 10 pages The Significance of Act 3 Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's Othello Othello was written by Shakespeare around 1602 and was set 35 years previously to that time (around 1571) during the Elizabethan era. Shakespeare got the idea for the play from the Italian Novella 'Gli Hecatommithi' and only changed minor details slightly. He kept the same plot but some of the characters and themes in the play were very different

Analysis Of Act One Scene 3 Of William Shakespeare's The Merchant Of Venice

1823 words - 7 pages Analysis of Act One Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's the Merchant of Venice Shylock, a Jewish moneylender, agrees to loan Bassanio three -thousand ducats for a term of three months. Bassanio assures Shylock that Antonio will guarantee the loan, but Shylock is doubtful because Antonio's wealth is currently invested in business ventures that may fail. In the end, however, Shylock decides that Antonio's guarantee of the