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Aeneas’ Haunting In Virgil's Aeneid Aeneas

1032 words - 5 pages

In epic stories the hero is traditionally confronted by supernatural entities that either strive to encourage or hinder him. In Virgil’s Aeneid Aeneas deals with the such supernatural interferences all of which focus on the goal of Aeneas creating Rome and its people. Throughout the books Aeneas is a truly ‘haunted’ individual faced with ghost, gods and even fate itself all of which attempt to prompt and govern his choices. Aeneas is subjected to the power of these forces as they lead him throughout a journey to create his fated city, propelling him to victory.
Immediately readers are introduced to Aeneas’ supernatural plight by Virgil, who states that Juno hates Aeneas. Virgil tells of ...view middle of the document...

After a bloody battle Juno finally admits defeat and allows Aeneas to win without anymore of her interference. Juno is not the only god interfering with Aeneas’ journey, Venus his mother plays a major role as well. She is the opposing force to Juno that attempts to assist Aeneas throughout his journey. Venus saves Aeneas life throughout the books, first from a losing battle in Troy and give him the weapons necessary to battle Turnus and create Rome; “Here are the gifts I promised, forged to perfection...you need not hesitate to challenge Laurentines or savage Turnus” (VIII. 828-831). She continuously encourages him and does what she must so he may reach his destiny. Each goddess and a few minor gods as well play a role throughout the journey of Aeneas and without them the story would have ended quickly in Troy. With their knowledge of Aeneas fate he became a point of avid interest to them.
Coinciding with the godly interventions of Aeneas’ journey comes about a spiritual one as well. With a book filled with war and death it is no surprise that Aeneas is also haunted by ghosts as well. Foremost is the ghost of Hector who warns Aeneas of the impending fall of Troy and warns him to escape with his family, gods and some people. It is this warning that rouses Aeneas to find his family and flee (with some help from Venus). Reaching safety he belatedly realizes his wife is missing, only to have her ghost appear and tell him it is too late to save her but his journey will bring him to a new wife in Italy. After much struggle Aeneas reaches Italy and decides to visit his father in the Underworld, the place of the dead. Aeneas sees the spectors of many of his friends and fellow warriors and even his second wife Dido. With his agony increasing Aeneas meets his father’s spirit and who shows him the “Dardan generations in after years… famous children in [his] line [to] come,...

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