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Affairs, Wealth, And Murder In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

2100 words - 8 pages

In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald tells about affairs, describes wealth, and tells about murder. There are three love affairs. One is Gatsby and Daisy and the other is Tom and Myrtle. Daisy cheats on Tom with Gatsby, Tom cheats on Daisy with Myrtle, and Myrtle cheats on her husband with Tom. In the end Tom and Daisy find out that they are cheating on each other. They blame everything on Gatsby and end up leaving town to get away from all the troubles they produced.
One of the main love affairs would be Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby. Daisy and Gatsby had been lovers before Daisy even met Tom. Daisy loved Gatsby and then he was sent off to war. Jordan told Nick that Gatsby wanted Nick to set up a get-together for him with his long lost love, Daisy (Baker). Nick agreed. He held the reunion at his house, but did not tell Daisy about Gatsby. Gatsby decorated Nick’s residence with a bunch of flowers to impress Daisy (Fitzgerald 84). Gatsby was very anxious to meet Daisy again. It had been five years since they had seen each other (Sutton). After Gatsby and Daisy met again, Nick leaves them unaccompanied to catch up on things. When Nick returned he could see that they still loved each other. After they talked for a while, Gatsby led Nick and Daisy through his colossal mansion next door.
The other main love affair would be Tom Buchanan and Myrtle. As Daisy, Tom, Nick, and Jordan were having dinner, Tom’s mistress called him. It was no secret that Tom was having an affair because Daisy and Miss Baker knew (Fitzgerald 15). Nick could tell that the telephone calls made Daisy awfully upset. After dinner Tom took Nick into town to visit a gas station that his mistress lived at. As Tom and Nick are leaving the gas station, Tom convinces Myrtle to party with them in their apartment (Baker).
Since Daisy had been meeting Gatsby a lot, Tom was especially apprehensive and decided to go to one of Jay Gatsby’s astounding parties with Daisy (Baker). While they were at the party Daisy snuck away to go meet up with Gatsby. Gatsby told Daisy his huge plans for Daisy to tell Tom that she never had feelings for him and for her to marry him. Gatsby and Nick are invited to have lunch at the Buchanan’s. Tom could tell that Daisy was edgy about Gatsby being there (Baker). Tom decided to take a journey into town to relieve some of the tension in the room. As they are on their way into town, Tom stops at his Myrtle’s gas station. He talks to her husband and finds out that her husband has suspicions of Myrtle cheating, so he is moving her away.
Tom felt as if he was losing everything he had. His wife is cheating on him with Gatsby and his mistress is moving away from him. Gatsby tries to get Daisy to go with his arrangement, but Tom and Gatsby end up getting into a quarrel (Baker). When Daisy left she was exceedingly tense, so Gatsby let her drive home. She was speeding past Myrtle’s gas station as Myrtle ran out into the street. Gatsby tried to swerve to miss Myrtle, but Daisy...

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