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Affairs, Wealth, And Murder In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

863 words - 4 pages

In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald tells about affairs, describes wealth, and tells about Murder. There are three different murders in The Great Gatsby. An automobile hit and killed Tom’s mistress, Myrtle’s companion shot Jay Gatsby, and Wilson committed suicide. Most of these murders happened as a consequence of the love affairs that happened throughout the book. Two love affairs in particular are a cause for all three of these murders. One was Tom Buchannan and Myrtle Wilson and the other was Daisy Buchannan and Jay Gatsby.
The first murder that occurred is the car accident. Tom and Jay Gatsby had a forceful quarrel over Daisy. This dispute left Daisy tense and puzzled. Daisy left the hotel ...view middle of the document...

George Wilson knew that Myrtle was having an affair, but he was not certain about who the affair was with. Tom saw how devastated Wilson was after Myrtle died, so Tom told him that Gatsby was her lover and that he killed his wife (Sutton). Tom told him this so that Wilson would never find out that he was the actual lover and because he was furious with Gatsby for trying to take Daisy away from him. Wilson fell for Tom Buchannan’s dishonesty. Wilson had no idea that Tom was actually Myrtle’s lover, not Gatsby (Sutton). Myrtle’s husband, Wilson, then went to Gatsby’s house and killed him (Sutton). After Gatsby was killed, “The chauffeur- he was one of Wolfsheim’s proteges- Heard the shots- afterward he could only say that he hadn’t thought anything much about them.” (Fitzgerald 161). Nick hurried over to Gatsby’s to find out what had happened (Fitzgerald 161). They found Gatsby’s body lying in his swimming pool.
The last murder that occurred was the suicide. The suicide happened because of Myrtle’s death. Wilson, her husband, was overwhelmed (Sutton). As mentioned earlier, Tom took advantage of the circumstances. After Myrtle is killed, “. . Tom sees Myrtle's husband, crazed with grief and deluded into thinking that whoever ran over Myrtle had been her lover and had killed her deliberately, Tom names Gatsby as the driver and gives Myrtle's husband directions to Gatsby's house. There Myrtle's husband, mistaken about Gatsby both as driver and as lover,...

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