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African Americans In Juice 1992 Essay

1173 words - 5 pages

Shaundre Moore

Juice is a 1992 American crime drama film that refers to the lives of four African-American youths in Harlem. It relates to the everyday life and activities in the young men's lives, starting as innocent bad behavior but grows more serious and propelling as time progresses. It also displays a strong emphasis on the struggles that the four must go through daily as well such as harassment by law enforcement and their relatives’ involvement in their lives.
Raheem Porter is played by Khalil Kain, the leader of The Wrecking Crew. He protects his friends earlier in the movie, when he breaks up a potential fight between them and Radames. After robbing Quiles's store with his ...view middle of the document...

Bishop finds out and shoots him. Steel narrowly survives and makes it to the hospital where he tells Q's girlfriend that Q is being framed by Bishop.
Omar Epps portrays Quincy "Q" Powell, the most sensible member of The Wrecking Crew. He knows right from wrong unlike his friends. He tries out for a DJ audition and makes it, before the robbery. When Bishop kills Raheem, Q is horrified as he and Bishop have been friends since second grade. Bishop framed him for the killings of characters throughout the movie.
The film received mostly positive reviews. Roger Ebert praised the film as "one of those stories with the quality of a nightmare, in which foolish young men try to out-macho one another until they get trapped in a violent situation which will forever alter their lives.”
The soundtrack for the movie was a success, making it to #17 on the Billboard 200 and #3 on the Top R&B Albums and featured four charting singles "Uptown Anthem" by Naughty by Nature, "Juice (Know the Ledge)" by Eric B. and Rakim, "Don't Be Afraid" by Aaron Hall and "Is It Good to You" by Teddy Riley & Tammy Lucas. Juice was certified gold by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) on March 4, 1992. This soundtrack boasts a lineup that stands as an absolute who's who of early-'90s hip-hop.

Shaundre Moore

Juice is a 1992 American crime drama film that refers to the lives of four African-American youths in Harlem. It relates to the everyday life and activities in the young men's lives, starting as innocent bad behavior but grows more serious and propelling as time progresses. It also displays a strong emphasis on the struggles that the four must go through daily as well such as harassment by law enforcement and their relatives’ involvement in their lives.
Raheem Porter is played by Khalil Kain, the leader of The Wrecking Crew. He protects his friends earlier in the movie, when he breaks up a potential fight between them and Radames. After robbing Quiles's store with his friends, he declares they must get rid of the gun, but is killed by Bishop after trying to take the gun from him.
Roland Bishop, the main antagonist of the film, is played by the late and great Tupac Shakur. He is a member of The Wrecking Crew and the most...

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