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Aimee Bender's The Rememberer And Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

1063 words - 4 pages

The characters in Aimee Bender's “The Rememberer” and Franz Kafka's “The Metamorphosis” are all adjusting to life after their love ones started to change. On each story the characters behaviors change and the reaction to each citation take a different perspective on life. Bender’s “The Rememberer” the narrator and Ben are lovers presenting a physical and intellectual connection to each other sadness “He was always sad about the word. It was a large reason why I love him. We’d sit together and be sad and think about being sad and sometimes discuss sadness” (Bender 101).

The narrator becomes sadder as Ben transform from a human to an ape, and finally a sea turtle. She is aware that Ben is somewhere inside the ape. At first she wanted to find the reason for the transformation. She becomes his protector, telling strangers and coworker he was ill, she did not want anything to happen to Ben. Then she fells lonely and she want to “to take care of my lover like a son, a pet” (Bender 102), hoping to retain Ben as long as she could. But the reality was that he is gone and she could not see him again. She finally realizes she have to let him go, because it was difficult for her to continue to see Ben in these conditions and without a sign of the human being she love so much.

The characters of Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” are similar in the aspect that the family members of Gregor the main character are going to a transformation as well. But they take a different approach than the Narrator and Ben in Bender’s “The Rememberer”. In Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis Gregor is traveler salesman that becomes a giant insect. He is his family providers and this transformation jeopardizes his job. As he struggles with his physical condition and worries about his family comfort, the chief clerk arrives to find out why Gregor did not report to work. Gregor reveals himself to his concerned family members and the clerk, who runs out of the apartment terrified. His family locks him on his room, his sister Grete is his care giver. She decides to remove his furniture from his room to make it more comfortable for him, but he resists this change because these belonging are the only thing lest of him as a human.

Gregor still concern about his family well been while his father only concern is that he would not be able to continue the life style he was use too. In a moment of fury Gregor father attached him with and apple injuring Gregor back. The family member’s mother, father and sister started to work. And the cleaning woman starts to care for him.
Gregor who once was the family provider became a house pest that must go; he was not a part of the family after the metamorphosis “He has to go”, cried the sister, “that is the only answer, father…” (Kafka 501). To all this dialogue Gregor only thoughts were thee distress his has cause to his family and he let himself die, the cleaning woman found him dead and disposed is body. To what his family felt a sense of relief,...

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