Alan Paton's Cry The Beloved Country

966 words - 4 pages

Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved Country


The book I have chosen to write about is Cry the Beloved Country. This book is about ambiguity and reconciliation. The main character in the story Stephan Kumalo has to deal his the struggle of his family, and trying to keep them together. The first few chapters of this book are place in a small town called Ndotshenti. But the action in this takes place in the largest city on South Africa, Johannesburg. Stephan Kumalo finds out there can be day light even when nothing in you life is going right.

The area of Ndoshenti is known as the “Velds”, which in Zulu means the green grassland. The rural country is what describes Ndotshenti best; on the other side of the town lies the European part of Ndotshenti. This is Ndoshenti where blacks are not allowed to go. Primarily because apartheid, which means total separation between blacks and whites.

Stephan Kumalo is the minister in the small town. Stephan Kumalo helps those in need of help. Also find out very early, he is in need of help too. His son Absalom decides to leave home, because he does not like his father’s new wife. He goes with his friends Johannesburg to work the gold mines.

However his son is not the only person causing stress on Stephan Kumalo, because with in a few days of his son leaving, he receives a letter pertaining to his sister. She very sick, but the man writing the letter says not physically, but mentally. At this point Kumalo is befuddle, until he finds out that she is selling her body in order to get money. He also remembers she has a little boy and is worried about his condition.

Stephan Kumalo decides to take a trip to the big city, to see if he can find his sister, and hopefully bring her back to his house. While there, he also planned to visit his brother John and see if knows the whereabouts of his son. So, he packs his bags and tells the people of the church he will be home in a few days.

He arrives in Johannesburg and immediately he feels out of place. The reason for this is because he is not use to seeing the fast life. Industrialization is a new phenomenon for Stephan Kumalo. Hustlers immediately notice he is a countryman out of place, and take advantage oh Stephan Kumalo. He looses most of his money but finds a kind man to get him to where his brother lives.

The next day he and his brother have an extensive conversation about their lives. John Kumalo tells Stephan that his son and Absalom are...

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