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Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

1466 words - 6 pages

Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

The New World, a man-made Utopia, governed by its motto, Community, Identity, Stability (Huxley 3). A man-made world in every way. Human beings fertilized in bottles. Identity, gender, intelligence, position in society, all predestined. Human beings classified in the order of precedence: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Every one conditioned to be a certain way. Every one works for every one else (Huxley, 74). All man-made to ensure social stability. Is society in the New World truly better than in the 2000s? Are people in the New World truly happier than we are in the 2000s? Do we in the 2000s have any thing in common with the New World? Are there significant sociological differences between the 2000s and the New World? These are questions I found myself pondering as I lay down Aldous Huxley's brilliant A Brave New World.

We have tremendous expectations of our Mothers. In the 2000s , our ideal Mother give life to her child, provides unconditional love to her child, and nurtures her child. There is a special bond between a Mother and her child. We have learned to recognize, respect, and appreciate the self-sacrifices and hardships that a Mother endures for her child. Those of us less fortunate, craves the love, care, and attention of a good Mother and good parents. To provide good parenting to our children are the goals and concerns of every good parents. Parental affection and guidance, or lack thereof, plays a vital role in our lives. We promote childbirth as a natural, fulfilling experience for women (Lamaze International, Online). In the New World, Mother is a smutty word (Huxley 36). Mothers, parents, and families were taught and understood as viviparous. Our 90s society would appear savage-like and unstable to the New World's civilized people. "The world was full of fathers ­ was therefore full of misery; full of mothers ­ therefore of every kind of perversion from sadism to chastity; full of brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts ­ full of madness and suicide." (Huxley 39). "Š What with mothers and lovers, what with the prohibitions they were not conditioned to obey, they were forced to feel strongly. And feeling strongly (and strongly, what was more, in solitude, in hopelessly individual isolation), how could they be stable? (Huxley 41)."

Feeling strongly toward any thing creates individual instability. Individual instability equals social instability. Civilized people of the New World are fertilized in bottles; thus, they have no parents. No parents, no mothers, no families to create emotions and boundaries. Hence, individual stability. Individual stability equals social stability. Civilized people, from childhood on, learned from hypnopaedia . Every one, as embryos were conditioned for their predestined station in life. Everyone will be happy with their predestined inescapable destiny because they are conditioned to be. Happiness is part of social stability. The majority of adults in the...

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