This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

All The President's Men, By Woodward And Bernstein

4988 words - 20 pages

Richard Nixon's first term as president will always be connected with the Watergate scandal, the biggest political scandal in United States history. Various illegal activities were conducted including burglary, wire tapping, violations of campaign financing laws, sabotage, and attempted use of government agencies to harm political opponents to help Richard Nixon win reelection in the 1972 presidential elections. There were about 40 people charged with crimes related to the scandal. Most of them were convicted by juries or pleaded guilty. Watergate involved more high-level government officials than any previous scandal. It has been etched in the minds of millions and is still being recalled today when faced with the present day scandal of President Clinton. In All The President's Men, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, former Washington Post reporters, recount, illustrate, and analyze the Watergate scandal time and their work in reporting and revealing these events for the newspaper.

The story begins on "June 17, 1972. Nine o'clock Saturday morning. Early for the telephone (13)." The telephone rings to awaken Bob Woodward. His editor wakes Woodward to inform him about a break-in at the Democratic headquarters that occurred late the previous night. The authorities arrested five men, one White House employee and four Cuban-American Miami citizens. They were found to be in the possession of high-tech surveillance and communication devices, along with hundreds of dollars, mostly in $100 bills in sequential order. In addition, the authorities also discovered two address books, a telephone number for Howard E. Hunt, consultant to the White House. The listing had small notations “W. House” and “W.H. (22).” This was the first indication that the President and his cabinet might be involved in this burglary. Woodward and Bernstein investigated this White House connection. As they delve deeper into this lead, they continuously discover larger crimes where more of the prominent White House staff was involved.

Woodward and Bernstein print all their findings in their articles in the Washington Post. The tremendous pressure on Nixon through their in-depth articles, along with the FBI’s investigations of him and his cabinet, ultimately led to the President’s resignation.

When Bernstein and Woodward were writing this book and their articles, they must have had some idea of the significance of their work. After all, they were printing a series of articles that pointed straight to the President. At this time, only one other impeachment inquiry existed, so Bernstein and Woodward’s work had to be as accurate as possible. They made sure of this through a few precautionary measures. First, they agreed never to let an article go to print unless they both fully agreed the article was worthy of printing should. When they were investigating the truth of a fact or statement, they always made sure that they checked it with at least two sources. When they made a...

Find Another Essay On All the President's Men, by Woodward and Bernstein

All The President's Men Movie Review

551 words - 2 pages Even thirty years after the Watergate burglaries and twenty-six years after its release, Alan Pakula's "All the President's Men" remains one of the best films ever made about the profession of journalism and its tricks. This movie is an extraordinary representation of the true account of two Washington Post reporters, Carl Bernstein, played by Dustin Hoffman, and Bob Woodward, played by Robert Redford, who helped uncover the most famous

Review of All the President's Men

955 words - 4 pages All the President's Men, written by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, is an account of the events concerning the break-in at the Watergate during Richard M. Nixon's term as President. Bernstein and Woodward have the most authority to write this book, as they uncovered most of the details. During the investigation, they were both reporters for the Washington Post. As the story was unfolding in Washington D.C., they were in a prime position to

"The Final Days" by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein

1475 words - 6 pages "The Final Days" by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein"The Final Days" by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein is about former president Richard Nixon and his involvement in the Watergate scandal. The first part of the book deals with the first two years of the Watergate Crisis and the second half is about the final 17 days of the Nixon administration.The first part of the book deals with how Nixon dug himself deeper and deeper in the scandal through

Soda Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in Men and Women. By: Bernstein, de Koning, Flint, Recrode & Willett,

1135 words - 5 pages research all emphasize and educate readers on the possible health risks involved in the consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages. Soda Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in Men and Women. By: Bernstein, de Koning, Flint, Recrode & Willett, 2012. This article discusses the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and how they have been seen to increase the risk of cardiometabolic disease. The researchers state that

All the Mice and Men

1102 words - 5 pages Of Mice and Men may not be a fairytale, but it gives the public the raw and real truth. It does not sugar coat anything. The book tells of the hardships of two very different men, who are inconceivably united together through circumstances. In the short novel, I grew to fully appreciate George and Lennie. I cried over their hardships and laughed at their cheers. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, I saw a theme that was surely meant to stand

West Side Story by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim

1847 words - 7 pages Musical theatre is a type of theatrical performance combining music, dance, acting and spoken dialogue. Written by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim, ‘West Side Story’ is a classic American musical based on William Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’. The through-composed score and lyrics are used to portray different characters and their cultures, the rivalry between the Jets and Sharks, and the emotions felt as the story progresses. This

"All the King's Men" by Robert Penn Warren: Summary and Response

956 words - 4 pages Summary:All the King's Men was written by Robert Penn Warren and published in 1946. It is about a politician named Willie Talos, who becomes the governor of a state somewhere in the South. The novel won the Pulitzer Prize in 1947, and was made into a movie in 1949. Willie Talos suddenly becomes well known throughout his state because of the collapse of a schoolhouse. He had warned the people not to use that contractor, who was known to use

All the President’s Men

629 words - 3 pages five men reveals to the court that he recently left the CIA. A confession that connects him all the way to President Nixon’s Special Counsel Charles Colson. The Washington Post Executive Editor becomes very concerned in having an inexperienced reporter covering a topic so potentially huge. So Carl Bernstein played by Dustin Hoffman, chosen to aid Bob Woodward with the Water Gate story. Woodward, was not too enthusiastic about having a partner

All the President’s Men

688 words - 3 pages bugging devices in their burglary attempt and James McCord, one of the five men reveals to the judge that he recently left the CIA. A confession that ultimately connects him all the way to President Nixon’s Special Counsel Charles Colson. The Washington Post Executive Editor becomes very wary of having an inexperienced reporter covering a topic so potentially ground breaking. Carl Bernstein, played by Dustin Hoffman, is selected to aid Bob

"All the King's Men" by Robert Penn Warren

1537 words - 6 pages In the novel All the King's Men, Robert Penn Warren, through his memorable character Jack Burden, analyzes the relationship between action and consequences and their far-reaching effects. Time, a linear measurement, differs much from its cousin, history, a record of the past whose hands touch the present and shape the future. Ellis Burden departing from his wife and Jack, Judge Irwin accepting a bribe from the American Electric Power Company

All The Kings Men

595 words - 2 pages Truth Versus Fact In Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men, the narrator, Jack Burden, has an internal issue concerning the truth versus the facts. This deficiency is demonstrated several times throughout the novel. On such occurrence being the "Cass Mastern" story, and another being the "Case of the Upright Judge". In these scenarios, Jack has problems differentiating between the truth and the facts. The first

Similar Essays

A Review Of All The President's Men By Carl Bernstein And Bob Woodward

960 words - 4 pages Review of All the President's MenAll the President's Men, written by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, is an account of the events concerning the break-in at the Watergate during Richard M. Nixon's term as President. Bernstein and Woodward have the most authority to write this book, as they uncovered most of the details. During the investigation, they were both reporters for the Washington Post. As the story was unfolding in Washington D.C., they

All The President's Men Essay

839 words - 3 pages All the President's Men The movie “All the President's Men” (1976), is based on the work of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein two Washington Post newspaper writers, who uncovered the cover-up of the White House's involvement in the Democratic Party National headquarters, Watergate, break-in. At first, Bob Woodward discovers what seems to be a minor break-in but is surprised to find that top lawyers were already on the defense case. He also

All The President's Men Essay

603 words - 2 pages All the President's Men The movie, All the President's Men, is about how the Watergate Crisis and how it was discovered that President Nixon was responsible for it. The two main characters, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, are reporters for the Washington Post who were mainly responsible for uncovering the President's link to the Break in. This movie is accurate in portraying Woodward and Bernstein's struggle against a powerful political

Comparing Fact And Fiction: All The President's Men

1161 words - 5 pages book All the President's Men (Bernstein and Woodward 13). Bernstein was the reporter who had more experience. "Bernstein was a college dropout. He had started as a copy boy at the Washington Post when he was 16, become a full-time reporter at 19, and had worked at the Post since 1966" (Bernstein and Woodward 15). The head reporter of The Washington Post notes in the movie on Woodward's lack of experience and asks that a more experienced