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Changes In The Piano Essay

1299 words - 5 pages

The piano is an amazing instrument used all over the world to express one’s feelings, emotions, and talent. The piano is used for entertainment, but for many, it’s used in a personal way to express feelings in a musical way. Obviously each musical instrument is unique to their own time period and no doubt the piano has been around for a while. It has gone through many changes in it’s time- changing along with the modern music of the day. I believe the piano has adapted over the years more so than other instruments. Reviewing how and when the piano changed as well as the modern piano is a great way to appreciate its worth and uniqueness.
Like everything else in existence, the piano has an origin. Stringed instruments had been around for a while, but to put such chords in a box was a different story. At around 1700, a man by the name of Bartolomeo Christofori from Padua, Italy ("Piano"). Christofori worked for the prince at the time, and was an expert of musical instruments. It is commonly thought that he had hoped to create an instrument that could be played with a loud sound, while still have smooth control, as if for musical concerts. It took a while for this new instrument to catch on, but once it did, it only kept improving. Consider that Gottfried Silbermann, an organ builder, constructed the piano with a small, yet important, personal touch-a foot pedal. For todays pianos, the foot pedal is standard and often very important. By 1747, Silbermann pianos were even accepted by the famous Johann Sebastian Bach. By the late 1700’s, pianos were growing even more popular. Viennese makers produced wooden pianos that had what we know to be opposite key colors (black for the primary keys, and white for the accents). Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a very popular musician, played on one of these pianos. History had begun to change along with pianos, which were becoming one of the top instruments in all aspects.
Aforementioned Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart influenced the upcoming “Mozart-era.” This was a major period for the piano, as it introduced many new additions ("Piano"). A popular encyclopedia describes this period, saying: “This revolution was in response to a consistent preference by composers and pianists for a more powerful, sustained piano sound, and made possible by the ongoing Industrial Revolution with technological resources such as high-quality steel, called piano wire, for strings, and precision casting for the production of iron frames.” As opposed to the typical wooden framing, with the advancements of production, so came the metal framing work. The sturdiness, and thus, the longevity of pianos, on a whole, increased. This extra sturdiness allowed more and heavier strings to be used. Thus, a higher quality sound was produced. Their design changed like a popular site says: “They were also much more ornate in nature and were as much a piece of art in the living room as they were a musical instrument.”(Turner) Also, the early pianos were known...

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