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A Ltitude Essay

2035 words - 9 pages

Adaptation seen in Tibetans of the Himalayas
Introduction
How do you think the Tibetans in Himalayas survived for centuries, despite the low oxygen and natural resources available? Would you like to know how they have adapted over the years? Tibetans of the Himalayas have adapted in the environment of higher altitudes in the mountains. It is important to observe cultural adaptation. A biological adaptation plays a significant role based on their natural selection. In addition, archaeological aspects are important as it is beneficial to know how long Tibetants have lived in the mountains and how it was identified.
Cultural adaptations
Historical records of the Tibetan population are very limited. About 99% of the Tibetan population is concentrated in the “one region and four provinces” of Northwest and Southwest China, i.e. TAR (Tibetan Autonomous Region), Sichuan, Quinghai, Gansu and Yunnan provinces. Ethnic Tibetans constitute over 96% of the TAR population. Tibetans have a common historic tradition, language and religion for over 1000 years. Tiber was divided into three regions known as Chol-Kha-Sum, Ngari Kor Sum and U-Tsang. U-Tsang (U=Central) has the famous cities and valleys of Tibet like Lhasa, Shigatse, Gyantse etc. Central Tibet is a place of religion (Tibetan Buddhism) and the three largest monasteries are located here (Ganden, Drepung and Sera). Tibet is largely occupied by many different groups of pastoral nomads, of which Golog in Qinghai are the most famous. The term Golog literally means “heads on backwards” which symbolically means handsome, war like independent rebels.
There are many different kinds of buildings, clothing, customs and languages in Tibet. It is not uncommon for Tibetans to not understand each other’s languages/dialects. Pastoral nomads mainly inhibit the Changtang region/ Tibetan plateau which occupies nearly 70% of the TAR land. Sometimes called “the roof of the world”, it stands over 4000 metres above sea level. Tibetan nomads are primarily livestock herders (yak, sheep, goats, cattle and horses). Without the Yak, the nomads may not have been able to survive. Tibet is the original home of the yak. Tibetan nomads called the yak “nor”, which means wealth and it is the principle resource of their economy. They provide heavy transportation and have great endurance even at high altitudes and large expanses of snow. They carry the nomads’ heavy and bulky black yak hair tents for long distances. They function as a kind of poor man’s horse and provide food, shelter and clothing. Their tents are made from Yak belly hair and their soft wool called kulu is used to make bags, blankets and ropes. The skin/hide is used for ropes, bags and boots. Yaks also provide large amounts of food such as meat, cheese, milk, yak butter and yogurt. Sheep also provide meat, milk, wool and sheep skin for winter clothing. Due to high altitude and poor climatic conditions, it is impossible for trees to sustain. Tibetans have solved the...

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