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America Must Take An Interventionist Role In Foreign Policy

609 words - 2 pages


The people of the African country of Somalia are in critical need of help. The
years are 1991-1992, and a serious civil war and devastating drought have caused
a widespread famine throughout the country. Numerous international relief
organizations have sent food and medical aid, but Somalian rebels have
confiscated the varying supplies and either used it for themselves, or destroyed
it. By late 1992, the nation was in complete anarchy, and hundreds of thousands
of Somalians were dying, from starvation, dehydration, or fighting. In
response, a U.S. military force entered Somalia to try to restore order and
ensure that suffering Somalians received food and medical care. Thanks to these
rescuing efforts, millions of people were saved from sure death (Robbins 93).
Since its beginning, America has faced the ever-continuing problem of how to
handle its foreign policies. When looking at the options, there are often two
general ideas: isolationism and interventionism. An isolationist nation avoids
allies, and avoids getting involved with foreign affairs and conflicts. An
interventionist nation is very involved in international affairs, and has many
political, economic, and military relations with foreign countries. America
has, and must continue to choose the role of the interventionism for many
reasons.

First and foremost, America must continue to promote its democratic ideals
throughout the world. Being the lone superpower in the world, and the only
nation capable of leading the world, America can help, more than any other, to
keep making the world a better place. In the years of 1948-1949, the people of
West Berlin were being trapped by a Soviet blockade. The Soviets were heavy
communists at the time, and there were many communistic threats rising in the
world. America proceeded to airlift food and fuel to the trapped, suffering
West Berliners. These airlifts not only greatly assisted the innocent people,
but also prevented the Soviets from...

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