America's Violence Fixation Essay

1309 words - 5 pages

America's Violence Fixation

One of America's biggest problems today is violence. It is happening
everywhere, in the households, out on the streets, even in our schools. When
we watch the news and see these acts of violence, we hear the blame be put to
one thing: entertainment. Movies and video games are supposedly causing young
people to behave aggressively in society, and maybe even compelling them to
kill. Some even believe that video rental stores should have policies, such
as always requiring an ID, and that some TV programs, movies, and games
glorify guns and violence, as well as the guns themselves
(center4policy.org). True, some films do portray murder and violence as
justifiable; films such as Blade, in which the title character killed
vampires in an effort to protect the human race, or The Matrix, where the
main characters used violence to free humanity from an artificial
intelligence. Video games also have a considerable amount of violence in them
as well. The main idea of Grand Theft Auto, one of the more popular video
games, is to overtake a city, even if it means using violence. Players are
allowed a various array of weapons from baseball bats to machine guns to
assist them in missions. Ratings are placed on games, this particular one is
rated "M" for "Mature". Retail stores are to check ID of customers in order
for them to purchase such games. However, that does not stop children from
borrowing the games from others, or even having unsuspecting parents buying
them. The question, however, is: "Is entertainment really the cause of
violence?" I have been affected personally by the media's claim that
entertainment causes violence. One morning on the news program Good Morning
America, the game Grand Theft Auto was brought up. They spoke about the
violent content of the game, and how there are certain age groups that should
not be playing it. My parents were watching it, and I was sat down and spoke
to about how it was not real, as if I could not distinguish fiction from
reality at age 18. I had also planned to have some friends over the following
day, who happened to be a year younger than I. After seeing this on
television, my parents, who had initially permitted me to have company, had
assumed that the reason that I had invited friends over was to play this
game. After seeing this on television, they then said that I could not have
anyone come over. One thing that I recall on the program that morning was
that a columnist for the Washington Post, Mike Wilbon, said that those who
created the game should be stoned to death. This man is basically saying that
violence can be ended with violence. Would that not mean that more violence
would be spawned? If he is thinks that the people who made it are evil, and
that they should be silenced by being stoned to death, what does that make
him? What makes him think that the violence would be stopped right there? I
...

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